CIVIL WAR SWORDS - Union

Appraiser, Dealer and Seller of Civil War Swords of the Union and Confederate Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Navy.

We buy, sell, authenticate and appraise Antique Civil War Swords and Sabers and always maintain a large selection of Antique Swords for Sale. We provide free estimates of value, information and identification on Union and Confederate Swords. We specialize in Tiffany, Inscribed and Presentation Swords. Contact us with questions about your swords.




Items 1 to 20 of 153 total

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  1.  
    CIVIL WAR SWORD OWNED BY A GENERAL
    CIVIL WAR SWORD OWNED BY A GENERAL

    CIVIL WAR SWORD OWNED BY A GENERAL

    This fine condition Ames Mounted Foot Officers Sword has the name "J. C. McFerran U.S.A." etched into its blade. The U.S.A. of course stood for United States Army. There was only one J. C. McFerran in the Army during this swords production and use time-frame and that was John Courts McFerran (1820 - 1872) who probably ordered or was presented this sword in 1855 upon his promotion to Captain. McFerran was born in Kentucky and died in Louisville, Kentucky, 25 April, 1872. He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1843 and assigned to the infantry. He served in the military occupation of Texas and the war with Mexico, being engaged at Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma. He was with his regiment on the frontiers of Texas and New Mexico until he entered the quartermaster's department and was made a captain on the staff on 20 August, 1855. Before and during the Civil War he was on duty in New Mexico, being promoted major and appointed chief quartermaster of that department on 30 November, 1863. In 1864-'5 he was Gen. James H. Carleton's chief of staff, and at the close of the war was brevetted brigadier-general. He was promoted lieutenant-colonel on 29 July, 1866, and served subsequently as chief quartermaster of the Department of Washington and of the Division of the South. This sword is in fine condition showing all of its fine Ames etching and generous gold gilt on the face of the guard. The grip is sound and 100% complete. The metal scabbard is a rare variation of Ames sword being a Mounted Foot Officers Sword and is also in fine condition with most of its original finish on an undented body. A rare sword carried on the Western Frontier and later during the Civil War to a man who eventually achieved the rank of Brigadier General at at a really great price considering its features and history.

    PRICE - $ 4,575.00


  2.  
    PRESENTATION SWORD OF WADE HAMPTON & HAMPTON FAMILY ARTIFACTS
    PRESENTATION SWORD OF WADE HAMPTON & HAMPTON FAMILY ARTIFACTS

    PRESENTATION SWORD OF WADE HAMPTON & HAMPTON FAMILY ARTIFACTS

    In the entire realm of Civil War Collecting perhaps the biggest prize, the most desirable and impressive, is the presentation sword. Such swords are not considered merely weapons of war. When presented, they are considered symbols of gallantry, patriotism, respect and even love. This is unquestionably one of the most important American Civil War Artifact Groupings ever offered for private sale from any era in American History, from any venue. This spectacular ensemble (which was originally purchased from the direct family descendants of Confederate Lieutenant General Wade Hampton with complete documentation) includes an Ames Militia Officers sword that is inscribed "Lieut. Gen. Wade Hampton, C. S. A.", inscribed family silver wear, inscribed coin-silver drinking cups, inscribed coin-silver pacifier, a beautiful brooch of Wade Hampton II with written presentation on the verso, a beautifully engraved business card holder with mechanical pencil and a few CDV's and extra's. Wade Hampton III (March 28, 1818 – April 11, 1902) was a Confederate cavalry leader during the American Civil War who was appointed commander of Cavalry of The Army of Northern Virginia by Robert E. Lee after the death of the beloved J.E.B. Stuart. Hampton was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1818, the eldest son of Wade Hampton II (1791–1858), known as "Colonel Wade Hampton", and Ann (née Fitzsimmons) Hampton. His mother was from a wealthy family in Charleston. The senior Hampton was an officer of dragoons in the War of 1812, and an aide to General Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans. The boy was the grandson of Wade Hampton (1754–1835), lieutenant colonel of cavalry in the American War of Independence, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and brigadier general in the War of 1812. After the war, his father had built a fortune on land speculation in the Southeast, and was said to own the highest number of slaves in the South numbering more than 3,000. Hampton grew up in this wealthy family and had an active outdoor life; he rode horses and hunted, especially at his family's North Carolina summer retreat, High Hampton. He was known for taking hunting trips alone into the woods, hunting American black bears with only a knife. Some accounts credit him with killing as many as 80 bears. In 1836 Hampton graduated from South Carolina College (now the University of South Carolina), and was trained for the law, although he never practiced. His father assigned certain plantations to him for his management in South Carolina and Mississippi. He also became active in state politics having been elected to the South Carolina General Assembly in 1852 and served as a Senator from 1858 to 1861. After Hampton's father died in 1858, he inherited his vast fortune. Although Hampton was conservative on issues of secession and slavery, and had opposed the division of the Union as a legislator, but when war began, he was loyal to his state. He resigned from the Senate and enlisted as a private in the South Carolina Militia; however, the governor of South Carolina insisted that Hampton accept a colonel's commission, although he had no military experience at all. Like in northern regiments, the elite were commissioned based on their social standing. Hampton organized and partially financed the unit known as "Hampton's Legion", which consisted of six companies of infantry, four companies of cavalry, and one battery of artillery. He personally financed all of the weapons for the Legion. Despite his lack of experience and relatively advanced age of 42, Hampton was a natural cavalryman—brave, audacious, and already a superb horseman. Of officers without previous military experience, he was one of two to achieve the rank of lieutenant general (the other being Nathan Bedford Forrest). Hampton first saw combat in July 1861, at the First Battle of Bull Run, where he deployed his Legion at a decisive moment, giving the brigade of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson time to reach the field. He was wounded the first of five times during the war when he led a charge against a federal artillery position, and a bullet creased his forehead. On May 23, 1862, Hampton was promoted to brigadier general, while commanding a brigade in Stonewall Jackson's division in the Army of Northern Virginia. In the Peninsula Campaign, at the Battle of Seven Pines on May 31, 1862, he was severely wounded in the foot, but remained on his horse while it was being treated, still under fire. Hampton returned to duty in time to lead a brigade at the end of the Seven Days Battles, although the brigade was not significantly engaged. After the Peninsula Campaign, General Robert E. Lee reorganized his cavalry forces as a division under the command of J.E.B. Stuart, who selected Hampton as his senior subordinate, to command one of two cavalry brigades. During the winter of 1862, around the Battle of Fredericksburg, Hampton led a series of cavalry raids behind enemy lines and captured numerous prisoners and supplies without suffering any casualties, earning a commendation from General Lee. In November 1862, he captured 137 men of the 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry at Hartwood Presbyterian Church. During the Battle of Chancellorsville, Hampton's brigade was stationed south of the James River, so saw no action. In the Gettysburg Campaign, Hampton was slightly wounded in the Battle of Brandy Station, the war's largest cavalry battle. His brigade then participated in Stuart's wild adventure to the northeast, swinging around the Union army and losing contact with Lee. Stuart and Hampton reached the vicinity of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, late on July 2, 1863. While just outside of town, Hampton was confronted by a Union cavalryman pointing a rifle at him from 200 yards. Hampton charged the trooper before he could fire his rifle, but another trooper blindsided Hampton with a saber cut to the back of his head. On July 3, Hampton was part of the Confederate cavalry actions to the east of Gettysburg, attempting to disrupt the Union rear areas. Leading a counter attack in the east field of Gettysburg with Lt. Colonel William G. Conner of The Jeff Davis Legion, he received two more saber cuts to the front of his head but continued fighting until he was wounded again with a piece of shrapnel to the hip while trying to save Conner, who had captured a Union Flag and had become surrounded, eventually being killed after shooting three Union troopers. Hampton was carried back to Virginia in the same ambulance as General John Bell Hood. On August 3, 1863, Hampton was promoted to major general and received command of a cavalry division. He did not return to duty until November. During the Overland Campaign of 1864, Stuart was killed at the Battle of Yellow Tavern and Hampton was given command of the Cavalry Corps on August 11, 1864. He distinguished himself in his new role at the bloody Battle of Trevilian Station, defeating Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan's cavalry, and in fact, lost no cavalry battles for the remainder of the war. In September, Hampton conducted what became known as the "Beefsteak Raid", where his troopers captured over 2400 head of cattle and over 300 prisoners behind enemy lines, the story of which was told with some accuracy in the movie "Alvarez Kelly" starring William Holden and Richard Widmark. In October 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia, Hampton sent his son, Thomas Preston, a lieutenant and an aide to his father, to deliver a message. Shortly afterward, Hampton and his other son, Wade IV, rode in the same direction. Before traveling 200 yards, they came across Preston's body, and as young Wade dismounted, he was also shot. Thomas Preston died from his wound. While Lee's army was bottled up in the Siege of Petersburg, in January 1865, Hampton returned to South Carolina to recruit additional soldiers. He was promoted to lieutenant general on February 14, 1865, but eventually surrendered to the Union along with General Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee at Bennett Place in Durham, North Carolina. Hampton was reluctant to surrender, and nearly got into a personal fight with Union Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick (often called "Kill-Cavalry") at the Bennett Farm. After the war, Hampton suffered devastating financial losses. His boyhood home, Millwood, near Columbia, was burned by Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's Union soldiers. In later life Hampton turned to politics serving as both Governor and as a United States Senator. He is often referred to as the Savior of South Carolina. To honor Hampton, statues of him were erected in the South Carolina State House building and the United States Capitol. An spectacular equestrian statue was erected on the grounds of the South Carolina State House in 1906. The General Assembly created Hampton County from Beaufort County in 1878. Schools, towns, villages and streets are still named after him. An artillery battery was named after Wade Hampton at Fort Crockett, built on Galveston Island, Texas. During World War II, the SS Wade Hampton, a Liberty ship named in honor of the general, was sunk off the coast of Greenland by a German U-boat. The list goes on and on. All items in this collection are for...

    PRICE - SALE PENDING ON SWORD, CALL FOR DETAILS ON OTHER ITEMS!


  3.  
    FETTERMANN MASSACRE ARTIFACT, GEORGE W. GRUMMOND SWORD
    FETTERMANN MASSACRE ARTIFACT, GEORGE W. GRUMMOND SWORD

    FETTERMANN MASSACRE ARTIFACT, GEORGE W. GRUMMOND SWORD

    I know several of you collect Indian War weapons and artifacts. Here's one for you, the likes of which you'll seldom get an opportunity to purchase again. It is without question, one of the most important artifacts of the Plains Indian Wars to have ever been offered for sale. It deserves to be in the finest of personal or museum collections. There is so much information on this (The Fetterman Massacre), one of the key events in American History that it's mind-bogling. Search the net for more. This sword is an imported, high-grade Staff & Field Officers Presentation Sword by Clauburg. It is in relic condition, obviously having been heavily field-altered and then exposed to the elements for a long period. In it's day, it was a beautifully gold-gilded, high-grade presentation sword with ruby or garnet stones decorating the pommel and an eagle-head quillon with ruby eyes. It is inscribed on its top mount, "Presented to Lt. Col. Geo. W. Grummond by the Staff & Line Officers of the 14th Mich. Vol. Infty, as a token of their esteem, Brentwood, Tenn. May 25th 1863". George W. Grummond was one of the most controversial figures of the American Civil War and Indian War periods. He has been described as courageous, heroic, reckless and careless in varying accounts of both his military service and personal life. On the surface Grummond had enjoyed what appeared to be a stellar Civil War career, rising from sergeant to lieutenant colonel in the volunteer army. Closer inspection of his military record, however, reveals that the rapid promotions resulted from near-reckless bravery in battle. His sometimes irresponsible leadership was matched by his sometimes violent and drunken behavior off duty. Grummond's conduct extended to his personal affairs. In 1862, during the second year of the war, he returned to his home in Detroit to recuperate from an illness. When Grummond re-enlisted in mid-1863 and left for Tennessee, his wife, Delia, was pregnant with their second child. A few months later Grummond was courting a beautiful Union sympathizer from a slave-owning family named Frances Courtney whom he had met while provost marshall in Franklin, Tennessee. In the Carolina campaign, he was sited for conspicuous gallantry leading the 14th when it captured almost 400 Confederates and the colors of the 54th Virginia and the 65th North Carolina regiments. When the war drew to a close, Grummond, instead of returning to his family in Michigan, headed to Franklin to "renew" his relationship with the clark-haired belle. Meanwhile, Delia filed for divorce and received a two-thousand-dollar judgment against Grummond in absentia on the grounds that he "grossly, wantonly, and cruelly refused and neglected" to support his family. Grummond appeared unconcerned with such legalities; he had already been married to Frances Courtney for twenty days when the Detroit judgment was rendered. Fleeing his financial obligations, Grummond applied for frontier service and accepted a commission as a second lieutenant, a huge demotion in pay and prestige even for the postwar officer corps. In June 1866, Grummond was under the command of Colonel Henry B. Carrington as he advanced into the Powder River country, the hunting grounds of the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Northern Arapaho. His objective was to protect emigrants traveling the Bozeman Trail. Carrington had 700 soldiers and 300 civilians under his command. He established three forts along the trail, including his headquarters at Fort Phil Kearny, near present day Buffalo, Wyoming. About 400 of the soldiers and most of the civilians were stationed at Fort Kearny. At Fort Phil Kearny the bigamist officer Grummond quickly resumed his dangerous behavior being nearly killed in an Indian ambush. Accounts claim after running out of ammunition, Grummond cut his way through a band of Indians with his sword, hacking their skulls left and right to escape, which he did successfully. The great Chief Red Cloud and his people soon tired of the white presence. He chose 4 warriors, Crazy Horse, Hunts the Enemy, Man Afraid of his Horses and American Horse, making them "Shirt Wearers", a type of promotion within the tribe to plan and execute a raid on the Pony Soldiers. The result of their effort was the famed "Fetterman Massacre", one of the main reasons for America's aggressiveness against the Plains Indians. I had barely heard of the Fetterman Massacre until I purchased this sword. To read about it gave me a new understanding of both the respect and often times hatred of the Sioux and Cheyenne. These four warriors set a trap for the Long Knives, assembling an estimated 1,000 - 2,000 braves, ready in ambush. About 10 a.m., on December 21st, 1866, Carrington dispatched a wagon train to the "pinery" – about five miles northwest and the nearest source of construction timber and firewood for Fort Kearny. Less than an hour later, Carrington's pickets on Pilot Hill signalled by flag that the wagon train was under attack. Carrington ordered a relief party, composed of 49 infantrymen of the 18th Infantry commanded by William J. Fetterman, 27 mounted troopers of the 2nd Cavalry under the command of Lt. Grummond and two civilians armed with the famed Henry Repeating Rifles, James Wheatley and Isaac Fisher. According to a Cheyenne informant named White Elk, who was interviewed as he walked the battlefield 48 years after the event, 10 warriors were chosen as the decoys to lead Fetterman into the ambush: two Arapaho, two Cheyenne, and two from each of the three Lakota bands present: the Oglala, Brulé, and Miniconjou. Approximately three times as many Lakota were in the battle as Cheyenne and Arapaho. White Elk said there were more Indians present than at the Battle of the Little Bighorn which would indicate an Indian force of considerably more than 1,000. Red Cloud was not present at the battle. To make a long story short, the soldiers were dispatched in under an hour, the result of the most terrible and barbaric slaughter recorded by the United States Army in the history of Indian warfare. The Indians had scalped, stripped, and mutilated the bodies of the soldiers. In his report to his superiors, Carrington listed some of the items he found on the battlefield the next day: eyes torn out and laid on rocks, noses and ears cut off, teeth chopped out, brains taken out and placed on rocks, hands and feet cut off, genitals severed and stuffed into unmentionable places, entrails scattered across the field, all muscles cut from virtually every body. The Oglalas seemed particularly vindictive towards the two civilian volunteers Wheatley and Fisher, who carried brand-new sixteen-shot Henry repeating rifles which may have caused a disproportionate number of Native American casualties. The two had had their faces 'smashed into bloody pulp, and Wheatley had been pierced by more than a hundred arrows. Carringtons official report claims that only six men were killed with bullets. The Indians killed most with arrows at first and waited for the Troopers to run out of ammunition. When that happened, the Indians closed in to capture and torture the survivors. The last trooper to die in the battle may have been Adolph Metzger, an unarmed teenage bugler who used his instrument as a weapon until it was battered shapeless. Metzger was the only soldier whose dead body was not mutilated by the Indians, for they instead covered it with a buffalo hide. It is thought that the warriors left his body untouched as a tribute to his bravery in standing alone against several enemies. Passing the place where the greatest slaughter had occurred, a relief party marched cautiously along the trail. Bodies were strung along the road clear to the western end farthest from the fort. Here they found Lieuten­ant Grummond. There were evidences of a desperate struggle about his body. Eyewitness Indian accounts claim Grummond decapitated the first Indian that approached him with his sword and dispatched several others before he was pulled from his mount, then beaten and dismembered alive. His skull was crushed with a war club and head nearly decapitated. All his fingers had been removed and his body filled with arrows. The judgment of the veteran soldiers and the fron­tiersmen, who knew that to retreat was to be annihilat­ed, had caused a few to hold their ground and fight until they were without ammunition; then with gun-stocks, swords, bayonets, whatever came to hand, they battled until they were cut down. Grummond had stayed with them, perhaps honorably sacrificing himself in a vain endeavor to cover the retreat of the rest of his command. The Indian loss was very heavy, but could not exactly be determined. Possibly the greatest mountain man of them all was with the party that viewed the battlefield, Jim Bridger, and he cut a lock of Grummonds hair for Carrington to return it to Grummond's wife back at the fort. As the years past, Carrington eventually married Grummond's widow. That's where this sword becomes very interesting. This sword was found around 2008 by a young woman in Wallingford, Connecticut. She was starting a framing business and the sword was in the wall of a home between the kitchen and...

    PRICE - $ 27,500.00


  4.  
    Civil War presentation sword of Lieut. A.W. Fix, 114th Pennsylvania volunteers
    Civil War presentation sword of Lieut. A.W. Fix, 114th Pennsylvania volunteers

    Civil War presentation sword of Lieut. A.W. Fix, 114th Pennsylvania volunteers

    This is a fine condition presentation grade staff and field officers sword made by Horstmann Brothers of Philadelphia. It is inscribed on a German silver plaque between the ring mounts, "To, Lieut. A. W. Fix, by the members of Co. E, 114 P. V., May 7, 1863". Augustus W fix mustered into the hundred and 14 Pennsylvania volunteers on August 17, 1861. The 114th had an illustrious career seeing service at Cedar Mountain, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Auburn, and Petersburg. Lieut. Fixx was cited for gallantry at Gettysburg in the official report of his commanding officer. This fine sword retains all of its original etching to its blade and shows an excellent condition sharkskin scabbard the grip is silverplated German silver, and shows fine quality engraving. During its today this was a very beautiful sword but it was one that was not saved for show but actually appears to have been used in battle is almost certain that fix carried this fine sword after its presentation.,

    PRICE - RECENTLY SOLD !


  5.  
    CONFEDERATE "CSA" RECTANGULAR BELT PLATE
    CONFEDERATE "CSA" RECTANGULAR BELT PLATE

    CONFEDERATE "CSA" RECTANGULAR BELT PLATE

    This is a fresh-to-the-market, untouched, rectangular CSA belt-plate buckle that came with this period belt. It has a wonderful, unaltered patina and all three hooks, one of which appears to have not been broken, but more likely a flaw in its original cast. It is unquestionably the nicest I have ever had and I'd almost like to keep it. I just can't afford to keep all the things I like and still pay the rent.

    PRICE - $ 3,995.00 - SALE PENDING !


  6.  
    IDENTIFIED CIVIL WAR SWORD, 14th WISCONSIN
    IDENTIFIED CIVIL WAR SWORD, 14th WISCONSIN

    IDENTIFIED CIVIL WAR SWORD, 14th WISCONSIN

    This is an early Schuyler, Hartley & Graham marked Civil War Foot Officers Sword historically inscribed, " Presented to Wm. Henry, By Co. E, 14th Reg. Wis. Vol. March 11, 1862". The sword is in generally good condition over-all with a nicely etched blade showing age, wear and use as does the hilt with small losses to its leather grip and virtually all of its gold-gilt now worn off. The scabbard is also well-used but complete and in good condition with one heavy crease. It's a very good sword that shows its carry throughout the war and certainly used in all weathers. It carried and used by a very good officer. Forty-one year old William Henry was one of the Ahnapee, Wisconsin men boarding the Comet in Ahnapee on October 13,1861. The men joined the Manitowoc and Kewaunee Rifles, which came to be known as Co. E, 14th Wisconsin Voluntary Infantry. Though Henry enlisted as a Private, the old fisherman provided leadership. He was a dour Scotsman who "knew what had to be done and he did it". William Henry was part of Co. E, 14th Wisconsin during the battle at Shiloh and many credited him with saving lives. It was said that the 14th did such a credible job at Shiloh "due to the stand of the grizzled old fisherman from Wolf River." Henry led much of Co. E. and part of the regiment without even being aware of it. He was silently directing battle by his advances and retreats. When his comrades realized what he was doing, they felt it was good to "tie to" and followed his lead. Henry advanced to captain. He and his men served with the same distinction at Vicksburg and Corinth they had shown at Shiloh. With a three-week furlough in January 1864, Co. E joined family and friends in Kewaunee County. William Henry spent time recruiting to fill ranks, although most of his men had re-enlisted, thus getting both the $402 bounty and the furlough. A February snowstorm blocked roads, preventing a return to Madison. The delay meant Co. E could not join the Red River expedition only to be organized under Major Worden to march with General Sherman in the famous March to the Sea. Co. E went through the Carolinas and to Washington, D.C. before rejoining their regiment at Montgomery. At the war's end, Co. E was in camp at Mobile, Alabama and was mustered out at Mobile 1865. Henry's leadership was recognized and he became Kewaunee County's most distinguished soldier, advancing to the rank of major. Following his discharge at Mobile in October 1865 Henry returned to Ahnapee then living on the bluff on the north side of the river on the point at which the Ahnapee River meets Lake Michigan. It was at that point where Henry began building ships. Good sword, good history.

    PRICE - SALE PENDING !!!


  7.  
    "JDA" MARKED CONFEDERATE ARTILLERY SHORT SWORD

    "JDA" MARKED CONFEDERATE ARTILLERY SHORT SWORD

    This is an extremely rare Confederate made Artillery Short Sword (sometimes called a Confederate Foot Artillery Sword). What makes this one unique is the original casting of the initials "JDA" onto one side of the pommel. Historians believe that this stands for "Jeff Davis Artillery", and that is why these are often referred to (but seldom seen) "Jeff Davis Artillery Swords". It is not known for certain where they were made nor what unit(s) may have used them, but they scream "Johnny Reb" from one end to the other. These are usually found in very poor condition and this example is probably better than average. It shows some pitting and a multitude of casting flaws on each side of the blade. The flaws are definitely Confederate earmarks as is the beautifully patinaed hilt, which shows an extremely high copper alloy content. I have had a couple inquiries about these over the years, so if you were one of the calls, come and get your sword. If you have one of these you wish to part with, let me know as we are always buying good Confederate Swords.

    PRICE - RECENTLY SOLD !!!


  8.  
    INSCRIBED ROBY CIVIL WAR FOOT OFFICERS SWORD
    INSCRIBED ROBY CIVIL WAR FOOT OFFICERS SWORD

    INSCRIBED ROBY CIVIL WAR FOOT OFFICERS SWORD

    Christopher Roby Manufacturing Company of West Chelmsford, Massachusetts produced high-grade edged weapons for private purchase as well as swords purchased under contract by the U. S. Government for issue to US and State Volunteer Troops. This is a really fine and untouched Roby Foot Officers sword inscribed on the throat, "Presented to Capt. A. J. Clough by his friends of Shirley". Clough was commissioned into Company D. of the 53rd Massachusetts Infantry. He was only in for a few months, being discharged for disability and probably saw no action. However what we have here is a sword that was presented and seldom used. Clough took care of the sword and the same was done through the ages until this day and the care with which it was kept leaves us with an almost mint blade and excellent condition scabbard. The mounts and hilt show 50 - 70% original gold gilt. A nice cleaning and oiling will provide a collector with a really excellent condition Roby to add to his collection. Roby is one of the most popular of Union made Officers Swords and they are seldom found in this exceptional condition.

    PRICE - $ 2,875.00 - SALE PENDING !!!


  9.  
    AMES CIVIL WAR FOOT OFFICERS SWORD
    AMES CIVIL WAR FOOT OFFICERS SWORD

    AMES CIVIL WAR FOOT OFFICERS SWORD

    This is a near mint condition Ames Foot Officers Sword. It retains 98% of its original Gold Gilt on the hilt, ring mounts and drag. The blade is near mint as its original leather scabbard. This is the classic Civil War model 1850 regulation style foot officers sword as contracted for by the United States Army and also sold privately to Union Officers. It is in near mint condition.

    PRICE - $ 4,250.00


  10.  
    CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE - MICHAEL SIMENS ANTIQUES
    CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE - MICHAEL SIMENS ANTIQUES

    CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE - MICHAEL SIMENS ANTIQUES

    This is a wonderful Confederate Knife and probably arsenal made. In classic D-guard construction with one huge exception. The hilt is entirely cast in brass. It has a hefty blade that's a foot long and its 14 & 1/2" over-all. The scabbard is original to the knife. Formerly in the well-known Union Drummer Boy Collection at Gettysburg.

    PRICE - $7,500.00


  11.  
    CONFEDERATE SWORD FOR SALE BY E. J. JOHNSON - MICHAEL SIMENS HISTORICAL ANTIQUES
    CONFEDERATE SWORD FOR SALE BY E. J. JOHNSON - MICHAEL SIMENS HISTORICAL ANTIQUES

    CONFEDERATE SWORD FOR SALE BY E. J. JOHNSON - MICHAEL SIMENS HISTORICAL ANTIQUES

    This is a very strong condition Confederate Foot Officers Sword by E. J. Johnson of Macon, Georgia. It has no scabbard but the sword itself is in very fine condition. It retains its near perfect and original polished wood grip with wire wrap, shows part of the original felt washer and a full length blade that shows 100% original etch with bold "CS" and patriotic motifs and a perfect "E. J. Johnson" makers etch. A great example of one of the best made Confederate Officers swords and one of the most popular due to their strong construction, attractive grips and deep etching.

    PRICE - SALE PENDING !


  12.  
    CIVIL WAR FOOT OFFICER'S SWORD
    CIVIL WAR FOOT OFFICER'S SWORD

    CIVIL WAR FOOT OFFICER'S SWORD

    This is an imported Civil war Foot Officers Sword in excellent condition. Although the scabbard shows some weathering, the blade, hilt and all mounts are nearly flat mint condition. The brass with all of its gold gilt and the blade with an elaborately etched surface that is nearly new. This is a great sword that is priced to sell.

    PRICE - $2,395.00


  13.  
    HISTORIC TIFFANY CIVIL WAR SWORD
    HISTORIC TIFFANY CIVIL WAR SWORD

    HISTORIC TIFFANY CIVIL WAR SWORD

    Nothing much needs to be said about this sword in terms of its grade and condition. It is simply magnificent so I'll first write about the man it was presented to. Medal of Honor winner Jacob Frick was born in Northumberland County on January 23, 1825, the ninth of sixteen children, fourth-generation descendants of a Swiss immigrant who had settled in Pennsylvania in the 1700s. In June of 1846, he was commissioned as a third lieutenant in the 3rd Ohio Infantry with the outbreak of the Mexican War, serving with gallantry in several engagements. After the war ended, Frick was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the 11th U.S. Infantry. He married in 1850 and garrisoned at a number of army bases across the country. Later in the decade, he served as assistant instructor of infantry tactics at Fort McHenry in Baltimore. Frick was a delegate to the 1860 Republican National Convention, where Abraham Lincoln received the presidential nomination. When war erupted, Frick was commissioned as the lieutenant colonel of the 96th Pennsylvania and fought in the Peninsula Campaign with notable gallantry at Gaines Mill, for which he was presented this sword as recorded in the Regimental History. On July 29, 1862, he became colonel of the 129th Pennsylvania (the members of whom presented him with this spectacular Tiffany presentation sword as recorded in the Regimental History of the 129th Pa.). Major General Joseph Hooker ordered Frick to lead the last charge at Fredericksburg in December, and he bravely guided his regiment toward the stonewall on Marye's Heights. Talk about "cool under fire"?, as Frick was approaching the wall on horseback along side of one of his captains, a shell burst nearby that splattered remnants of a horse about the Colonel and his Officer. Plucking a large chunk of horse-flesh off of his shoulder, he handed it to his captain and asked him to save the meat for dinner later that evening! The flag bearer and most of the color guard went down as the battle line advanced. Frick quickly seized and raised the fallen flag, but almost instantly, a Minnié ball passed close to his head and sheared the wooden staff in two. Undaunted, Frick continued at the head of his command until he was wounded. The remnants of this flag staff were later fashioned into an exquisite presentation cane with a large, delicately engraved handle with presentation and history recorded about its circumference. It remains in this case today as one of the most fantastic and important historical Civil War artifacts ever to have been discovered along with a Tiffany presentation grade set of Colonels shoulder straps. At Chancellorsville, Frick's precision in handling his regiment impressed his brigadier, who declared that "no man ever saw cooler work" than what the 129th Pennsylvania did during the confused fighting. Their firing was "grand - by rank, by company, and by wings, all in perfect order." His embattled soldiers clearly heard Colonel Frick's stentorian voice above the roar of musketry, and his regiment "did its duty well." Six feet, two inches tall and powerfully built, he counter-attacked a superior force after his colors and many of his men were captured. He he recaptured the regiment's lost flag and all of his men in hand-to-hand combat with a large body of Rebels and made prisoners of those who dared capture his colors. His regiment mustered out in May and Frick returned to Pottsville. When Robert E. Lee's invasion threatened the Keystone State, Frick hurried to Harrisburg to assume command of the 807-man 27th Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia. It had been raised primarily in Frick's native Schuylkill County in north-central Pennsylvania, as well as in nearby Northampton, Huntingdon, and Berks counties. Frick's regiment traveled by train from Harrisburg to Columbia, where they formed the bulk of the troops defending the bridge. When John B. Gordon's brigade attacked, Frick skillfully withdrew his militia across the bridge, setting it on fire to prevent Rebel passage. Later, his men were involved in the pursuit of the retreating Robert E. Lee, and the 27th was the first Pennsylvania militia to cross into Maryland while chasing the Army of Northern Virginia. He and the regiment mustered out in August 1863. In June 1864, he assisted Brigadier General Henry Pleasants in planning the explosives-filled, 230-foot-long tunnel under the Petersburg entrenchments, which resulted in "the Battle of the Crater." Frick is one of only 2 American Soldiers nominated for 3 Medals of Honor that I am aware of. One for Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and for the Gettysburg campaign, (Wrightsville). After the war he remained interested in politics, serving as a delegate to the Republican National Convention in both 1860 and 1868. He remarried after the war, raised a son, authored two books, and manufactured wire screens for the coal mining industry. In 1892, Frick received the Medal of Honor for his valor at Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg. He passed away March 5, 1902, and was buried in Pottsville's Presbyterian Cemetery. He was the first man in Schuylkill County to receive the Medal of Honor. This sword is one of only two (possibly 3) of this pattern known to collectors but as far as I'm aware, it is the only one with a solid silver scabbard (marked Tiffany .925 near the throat). This is without question, the finest sword that I have ever handled when combining the quality of the sword and the man to whom it was presented to. It is one of the most heavily featured swords in John Thilmann's book, "Civil War Cavalry & Artillery Sabers". It is breathtaking. Serious buyers can contact me for a further description and information.

    PRICE - SALE PENDING !


  14.  
    CIVIL WAR SWORD, PRESENTATION MEDAL OF HONOR WINNER
    CIVIL WAR SWORD, PRESENTATION MEDAL OF HONOR WINNER


  15.  
    Eagle Hilt war of 1812 Saber / SWord
    Eagle Hilt war of 1812 Saber / SWord

    Eagle Hilt war of 1812 Saber / SWord

    This is a good condition sword from the period 1800 - 1815. The blade shows use and weathering and has been cleaned at one time revealing some scattered light roughness at with the bold eagle head on the pommel, the blade shows an etched patriotic eagle and the mottos "E. Pluribus Unum" and "Honor and My Country". The wood or ebony grip (which looks like tortoise shell) is finely checkered and in great condition save for a few minor cracks. There is no scabbard but this is a nice representative example of work during the period that probably saw service in the War of 1812 and further into U.S. history.

    PRICE - $ 875.00


  16.  
    AMES CIVIL WAR SWORD, FOOT OFFICER'S
    AMES CIVIL WAR SWORD, FOOT OFFICER'S

    AMES CIVIL WAR SWORD, FOOT OFFICER'S

    This is a super condition Ames Foot Officers Sword in excellent condition, dated (1861) and inspected. It retains 95% plus gold gilt to the guard and mounts. Has a scabbard that is excellent and sturdy with just minor handling marks and the blade is a 9.5 out of 10 with very frosty etching. This sword would rate at 98% condition to one dated 1862 and sold off of this website for the same price a few months ago.

    PRICE - $ 5,985.00


  17.  
    CIVIL WAR NAVAL OFFICERS SWORD, MEDAL-OF-HONOR
    CIVIL WAR NAVAL OFFICERS SWORD, MEDAL-OF-HONOR

    CIVIL WAR NAVAL OFFICERS SWORD, MEDAL-OF-HONOR

    This is a very rare bird. William Thompson was a signal quartermaster during the Civil War. His Medal-of-Honor Citation reads as follows, "The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Signal Quartermaster William Thompson, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism during action of the main squadron of ships against heavily defended Forts Beauregard and Walker on Hilton Head, South Carolina, 7 November 1861. Serving as Signal Quartermaster on board the U.S.S. Mohican, William Thompson steadfastly steered the ship with a steady and bold heart under the batteries; was wounded by a piece of shell but remained at his station until he fell from loss of blood. Legs since amputated." General Orders: War Department, General Order No. 17 (July 10, 1863). I don't have to tell many collectors how rare it is to find a wartime MOH winner. Call for details.

    PRICE - $ 13,750.00


  18.  
    CIVIL WAR SWORD, ROBY OFFICER'S SWORD
    CIVIL WAR SWORD, ROBY OFFICER'S SWORD

    CIVIL WAR SWORD, ROBY OFFICER'S SWORD

    This is a beautiful Civil War Foot Officers Sword by Roby with a nearly mint etched blade and rare, nearly perfect condition brown lacquered scabbard. It retains 80% gold gilt to the hilt and 20% gold to its brass mounts. The shark-skin grip is near perfect with triple-strand brass wire affixed. A great sword by a famous maker that has seen very little use. A wonderful example of a rare variation of Civil War Officers sword, one with a metal rather than a leather scabbard.

    PRICE - $3,250.00


  19.  
    AMES ARTILLERY SABER, HISTORICAL ARCHIVE
    AMES ARTILLERY SABER, HISTORICAL ARCHIVE

    AMES ARTILLERY SABER, HISTORICAL ARCHIVE

    This is an outstanding archive of artifacts that came from the estate of Buel Butler, 25th Ohio Light Artillery. Included are Butlers Ames Artillery Sabre, GAR medals and certificate, deeds from Kirtland, Ohio (where I located this archive), other official documents, an appointment to Postmaster of Kirtland, Ohio signed by Postmaster General of the United States and former Ohio Governor William Dennison and 12 identified (most with signature) CDV's of some fellow soldiers from Ohio that also served in the 25th.

    PRICE - $5,500.00 - REDUCED TO $4,985.00 !!!


  20.  
    CIVIL WAR SWORD BY SAUERBIER
    CIVIL WAR SWORD BY SAUERBIER

    CIVIL WAR SWORD BY SAUERBIER

    This is a fine condition and early Civil War Staff & Field Officers Sword manufactured by Sauerbier, one of the most popular and unusually gifted makers of swords during the Civil War. This example has a fine condition etched blade with a bit of staining here and there, but with all of its etch visible. The hilt is wonderful with a near perfect leather grip and almost all of its bright gold gilt. The scabbard is one of the best I've ever seen on a Sauerbier, with almost all of its brown lacquer finish and all the gold to the mounts, the middle mount cast in the rare and desirable "Skull & Crossbones" motif. This is a great Sauerbier Officers Sword.

    PRICE - $3,450.00 - SALE PENDING !

 

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