Civil War Artifacts

Appraiser, Collector, Buyer and Seller of Authentic Civil War Artifacts to include original Civil War and Confederate flags, uniforms, saddles, drums, photos, badges, medals, guns, swords, cannons, knives and related artifacts.

We provide prices, information, estimates of value, formal appraisals and authentication services on all types of Original Antique Military and Pioneer Arms, Artifacts, Collectibles and Relics manufactured prior to 1898. We buy single items or entire collections and specialize in Confederate and Union Artifacts. Call us for information on your artifacts.




Items 1 to 20 of 110 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

  1.  
    CIVIL WAR CARTRIDGE BOX WITH ORIGINAL STRAP AND PLATES
    CIVIL WAR CARTRIDGE BOX WITH ORIGINAL STRAP AND PLATES

    CIVIL WAR CARTRIDGE BOX WITH ORIGINAL STRAP AND PLATES

    This is a really nice condition and early Civil War era Cartridge Box with its original canvas strap, probably issued to Militia early in the Civil War. It is 100% original, dirty and dusty as it came to us directly from a widow who had no idea who in her family originally owned it. The leather is in very good condition and the strap is about perfect. One of the fastener buckles is very loos and needs a good glue or epoxy repair before it breaks off. Both buckles are original to the box and strap and have never been touched and retain their natural patina. This is a really nice rig.

    PRICE - $ 1,375.00 - SALE PENDING !


  2.  
    CIVIL WAR KEPI FOR SALE
    CIVIL WAR KEPI FOR SALE

    CIVIL WAR KEPI FOR SALE

    This is an extremely fine condition Kepi considering exactly what it is. This is an extremely early hat, probably manufactured in the first 18 months of the war and usually very difficult to find in this condition. Save for a few moth nips, it is excellent retaining full sweat band, original label and a perfectly stitched visor and chin strap showing little to no use. Note the extremely wide visor with full curve its entire width, the early feature.

    PRICE - $3,450.00


  3.  
    FETTERMANN MASSACRE ARTIFACT, GEORGE W. GRUMMOND SWORD
    FETTERMANN MASSACRE ARTIFACT, GEORGE W. GRUMMOND SWORD

    FETTERMANN MASSACRE ARTIFACT, GEORGE W. GRUMMOND SWORD

    I know several of you collect Indian War weapons and artifacts. Here's one for you, the likes of which you'll seldom get an opportunity to purchase again. It is without question, one of the most important artifacts of the Plains Indian Wars to have ever been offered for sale. It deserves to be in the finest of personal or museum collections. There is so much information on this (The Fetterman Massacre), one of the key events in American History that it's mind-bogling. Search the net for more. This sword is an imported, high-grade Staff & Field Officers Presentation Sword by Clauburg. It is in relic condition, obviously having been heavily field-altered and then exposed to the elements for a long period. In it's day, it was a beautifully gold-gilded, high-grade presentation sword with ruby or garnet stones decorating the pommel and an eagle-head quillon with ruby eyes. It is inscribed on its top mount, "Presented to Lt. Col. Geo. W. Grummond by the Staff & Line Officers of the 14th Mich. Vol. Infty, as a token of their esteem, Brentwood, Tenn. May 25th 1863". George W. Grummond was one of the most controversial figures of the American Civil War and Indian War periods. He has been described as courageous, heroic, reckless and careless in varying accounts of both his military service and personal life. On the surface Grummond had enjoyed what appeared to be a stellar Civil War career, rising from sergeant to lieutenant colonel in the volunteer army. Closer inspection of his military record, however, reveals that the rapid promotions resulted from near-reckless bravery in battle. His sometimes irresponsible leadership was matched by his sometimes violent and drunken behavior off duty. Grummond's conduct extended to his personal affairs. In 1862, during the second year of the war, he returned to his home in Detroit to recuperate from an illness. When Grummond re-enlisted in mid-1863 and left for Tennessee, his wife, Delia, was pregnant with their second child. A few months later Grummond was courting a beautiful Union sympathizer from a slave-owning family named Frances Courtney whom he had met while provost marshall in Franklin, Tennessee. In the Carolina campaign, he was sited for conspicuous gallantry leading the 14th when it captured almost 400 Confederates and the colors of the 54th Virginia and the 65th North Carolina regiments. When the war drew to a close, Grummond, instead of returning to his family in Michigan, headed to Franklin to "renew" his relationship with the clark-haired belle. Meanwhile, Delia filed for divorce and received a two-thousand-dollar judgment against Grummond in absentia on the grounds that he "grossly, wantonly, and cruelly refused and neglected" to support his family. Grummond appeared unconcerned with such legalities; he had already been married to Frances Courtney for twenty days when the Detroit judgment was rendered. Fleeing his financial obligations, Grummond applied for frontier service and accepted a commission as a second lieutenant, a huge demotion in pay and prestige even for the postwar officer corps. In June 1866, Grummond was under the command of Colonel Henry B. Carrington as he advanced into the Powder River country, the hunting grounds of the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Northern Arapaho. His objective was to protect emigrants traveling the Bozeman Trail. Carrington had 700 soldiers and 300 civilians under his command. He established three forts along the trail, including his headquarters at Fort Phil Kearny, near present day Buffalo, Wyoming. About 400 of the soldiers and most of the civilians were stationed at Fort Kearny. At Fort Phil Kearny the bigamist officer Grummond quickly resumed his dangerous behavior being nearly killed in an Indian ambush. Accounts claim after running out of ammunition, Grummond cut his way through a band of Indians with his sword, hacking their skulls left and right to escape, which he did successfully. The great Chief Red Cloud and his people soon tired of the white presence. He chose 4 warriors, Crazy Horse, Hunts the Enemy, Man Afraid of his Horses and American Horse, making them "Shirt Wearers", a type of promotion within the tribe to plan and execute a raid on the Pony Soldiers. The result of their effort was the famed "Fetterman Massacre", one of the main reasons for America's aggressiveness against the Plains Indians. I had barely heard of the Fetterman Massacre until I purchased this sword. To read about it gave me a new understanding of both the respect and often times hatred of the Sioux and Cheyenne. These four warriors set a trap for the Long Knives, assembling an estimated 1,000 - 2,000 braves, ready in ambush. About 10 a.m., on December 21st, 1866, Carrington dispatched a wagon train to the "pinery" – about five miles northwest and the nearest source of construction timber and firewood for Fort Kearny. Less than an hour later, Carrington's pickets on Pilot Hill signalled by flag that the wagon train was under attack. Carrington ordered a relief party, composed of 49 infantrymen of the 18th Infantry commanded by William J. Fetterman, 27 mounted troopers of the 2nd Cavalry under the command of Lt. Grummond and two civilians armed with the famed Henry Repeating Rifles, James Wheatley and Isaac Fisher. According to a Cheyenne informant named White Elk, who was interviewed as he walked the battlefield 48 years after the event, 10 warriors were chosen as the decoys to lead Fetterman into the ambush: two Arapaho, two Cheyenne, and two from each of the three Lakota bands present: the Oglala, Brulé, and Miniconjou. Approximately three times as many Lakota were in the battle as Cheyenne and Arapaho. White Elk said there were more Indians present than at the Battle of the Little Bighorn which would indicate an Indian force of considerably more than 1,000. Red Cloud was not present at the battle. To make a long story short, the soldiers were dispatched in under an hour, the result of the most terrible and barbaric slaughter recorded by the United States Army in the history of Indian warfare. The Indians had scalped, stripped, and mutilated the bodies of the soldiers. In his report to his superiors, Carrington listed some of the items he found on the battlefield the next day: eyes torn out and laid on rocks, noses and ears cut off, teeth chopped out, brains taken out and placed on rocks, hands and feet cut off, genitals severed and stuffed into unmentionable places, entrails scattered across the field, all muscles cut from virtually every body. The Oglalas seemed particularly vindictive towards the two civilian volunteers Wheatley and Fisher, who carried brand-new sixteen-shot Henry repeating rifles which may have caused a disproportionate number of Native American casualties. The two had had their faces 'smashed into bloody pulp, and Wheatley had been pierced by more than a hundred arrows. Carringtons official report claims that only six men were killed with bullets. The Indians killed most with arrows at first and waited for the Troopers to run out of ammunition. When that happened, the Indians closed in to capture and torture the survivors. The last trooper to die in the battle may have been Adolph Metzger, an unarmed teenage bugler who used his instrument as a weapon until it was battered shapeless. Metzger was the only soldier whose dead body was not mutilated by the Indians, for they instead covered it with a buffalo hide. It is thought that the warriors left his body untouched as a tribute to his bravery in standing alone against several enemies. Passing the place where the greatest slaughter had occurred, a relief party marched cautiously along the trail. Bodies were strung along the road clear to the western end farthest from the fort. Here they found Lieuten­ant Grummond. There were evidences of a desperate struggle about his body. Eyewitness Indian accounts claim Grummond decapitated the first Indian that approached him with his sword and dispatched several others before he was pulled from his mount, then beaten and dismembered alive. His skull was crushed with a war club and head nearly decapitated. All his fingers had been removed and his body filled with arrows. The judgment of the veteran soldiers and the fron­tiersmen, who knew that to retreat was to be annihilat­ed, had caused a few to hold their ground and fight until they were without ammunition; then with gun-stocks, swords, bayonets, whatever came to hand, they battled until they were cut down. Grummond had stayed with them, perhaps honorably sacrificing himself in a vain endeavor to cover the retreat of the rest of his command. The Indian loss was very heavy, but could not exactly be determined. Possibly the greatest mountain man of them all was with the party that viewed the battlefield, Jim Bridger, and he cut a lock of Grummonds hair for Carrington to return it to Grummond's wife back at the fort. As the years past, Carrington eventually married Grummond's widow. That's where this sword becomes very interesting. This sword was found around 2008 by a young woman in Wallingford, Connecticut. She was starting a framing business and the sword was in the wall of a home between the kitchen and...

    PRICE - $ 27,500.00


  4.  
    CIVIL WAR CAVALRY GAUNTLETS FOR SALE
    CIVIL WAR CAVALRY GAUNTLETS FOR SALE

    CIVIL WAR CAVALRY GAUNTLETS FOR SALE

    This is an original pair of Civil War Cavalry Gauntlets in very good to fine condition. These are very sound and supple with no damage. They just need to have some paper towels or other media stuffed into the fingers to straighten them out. These are getting almost impossible to find in good condition and other than being a little dirty, these are really nice.

    PRICE - $ 650.00 - SALE PENDING !


  5.  
    INSCRIBED CIVIL WAR CORPS BADGE - SIGNAL CORPS
    INSCRIBED CIVIL WAR CORPS BADGE - SIGNAL CORPS

    INSCRIBED CIVIL WAR CORPS BADGE - SIGNAL CORPS

    This is a really super Army of the Potomac Medal that is inscribed on its back, "Major J. C. Paine, Signal Officer, HeadQuarters, Army Potomac". Signal Corps Artifacts are extremely rare and this would be great item to add to a collection from that organization. Paine first mustered into the 57th New York Infantry as a First Lieutenant in August of 1861. He was commissioned as a Captain in the Signal Corps in March of 1863 and moved up in rank to eventually be Brevetted to Lt. Colonel serving as a commander in Virginia. This man needs further research, which I'll leave to the buyer.

    PRICE - $ 1,350.00


  6.  
    MOUNTED OFFICERS STIRRUPS, WAR OF 1812 - CIVIL WAR
    MOUNTED OFFICERS STIRRUPS, WAR OF 1812 - CIVIL WAR

    MOUNTED OFFICERS STIRRUPS, WAR OF 1812 - CIVIL WAR

    This is a good condition pair of Mounted Officer's Stirrups as used by high ranking Federal and Volunteer Officers as early as the War of 1812 and used through the Civil War. The are made of iron and are coated with brass. I doubt that the coating of brass is sheet as many claim. Rather, these parts and others like them are hot dipped, similar to the production of galvanized steel where steel parts are dipped into the molten zinc or sheet on a continuous mill that runs into a vat of molten zinc and rises out with a few thousands of an inch of shiny crystalized zinc on the surface. I doubt that there were rows of workmen with teeny tiny hammers clanking away on sheet brass to form it over these stirrups. The only alternative process during their period of manufacture that was efficient and makes sense was a molten dip. The coating provided corrosion resistance and was quite decorative. After polishing, these would be have been lacquered or had a flash of gold gilt applied for the finished effect. This pair, which I estimate was made during the Mexican War, retain all of there brass coating, but are filthy dirty. They are untouched. A gentle cleaning would bring them back to life and these are great for display on a book-shelf or when put onto a fine period saddle. These used to sell for $2500 - 3500.00. These are quite reasonably priced.

    PRICE - $ 2,285.00


  7.  
    CIVIL WAR GOLD AND SILVER CORPS BADGE - 102nd NEW YORK
    CIVIL WAR GOLD AND SILVER CORPS BADGE - 102nd NEW YORK

    CIVIL WAR GOLD AND SILVER CORPS BADGE - 102nd NEW YORK

    This is a really nice Corps Badge identified to a member of the 102nd New York Infantry, Charles Fleet of Company F. Charles mustered into the 102nd as a private on 12/3/61 and was in for the duration of the war having re-elisted 12/30/63. He mustered out in July of 1865 and reached the rank of Corporal. The 102nd saw plenty of fighting during the war, seeing action at Cedar Mountain, 2nd Bull Run, Antietam, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg and then headed west to participate in many of the battles of the Atlanta Campaign to include Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold Gap, Mill Creek, Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, the March to Savanna and finally the Carolina's. The medal itself is gorgeous, made of coin or sterling silver with a 12 - 14 carat gold disc on the face. The top pin is inscribed "C. E. Fleet", and the gold disc, "Co. H, 102, N.Y.V.V.". The entire 12th Corps Star surface is hand chased and engraved in decorative motif to enhance its body, the star of The medal does not appear to have ever been cleaned or touched. A great Corps Badge Medal about the size of a half-dollar.

    PRICE - $ 3,450.00


  8.  
    CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE - MICHAEL SIMENS ANTIQUES
    CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE - MICHAEL SIMENS ANTIQUES

    CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE - MICHAEL SIMENS ANTIQUES

    This is a wonderful Confederate Knife and probably arsenal made. In classic D-guard construction with one huge exception. The hilt is entirely cast in brass. It has a hefty blade that's a foot long and its 14 & 1/2" over-all. The scabbard is original to the knife. Formerly in the well-known Union Drummer Boy Collection at Gettysburg.

    PRICE - $7,500.00


  9.  
    ORIGINAL CIVIL WAR FLAG
    ORIGINAL CIVIL WAR FLAG

    ORIGINAL CIVIL WAR FLAG

    This is an outstanding, 35 Star Regulation Civil War Flag, possibly made by Tiffany & Company and identified to the 46th Ohio Volunteers. It is in excellent condition as preserved by the family of the soldier that brought it home when his term of service expired. It is accompanied with its original flag-staff and a period cabinet card photo of some descendants holding this very flag. Call for further details as this is a particularly beautiful flag that deserves some phone time.

    PRICE - $24,875.00


  10.  
    PRE-CIVIL WAR OFFICERS BRIDLE BIT
    PRE-CIVIL WAR OFFICERS BRIDLE BIT

    PRE-CIVIL WAR OFFICERS BRIDLE BIT

    This is an outstanding Horse Bit in excellent condition with patriotic Eagle bosses mounted to each side. This wonderful bit is early enough to have been use in both the Seminole and Mexican War and these are most often associated with Generals or other high ranking officers. I have a few similar bits in my collection but have a duplicate to this one. This is a great find that is seldom encountered.

    PRICE - $ 2,875.00


  11.  
    GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN BUSINESS CARD, A. S. WEBB SIGNATURE ON VERSO
    GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN BUSINESS CARD, A. S. WEBB SIGNATURE ON VERSO

    GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN BUSINESS CARD, A. S. WEBB SIGNATURE ON VERSO

    This is a business card of General William Tecumseh Sherman as acting General of the United States as stationed in Washington D. C. after the Civil War. In good condition, it appears to have a partial signature of Major General Alexander S. Webb on the reverse. This card came from the Virgil Mylin collection who acquired many original Webb artifacts over the 1980's and 90's to include all his Presidential signed Commissions, Inscribed Meade Medal and Inscribed Martingale. In good condition.

    PRICE - $ 750.00


  12.  
    CIVIL WAR FROCK COAT, ARTILLERY
    CIVIL WAR FROCK COAT, ARTILLERY

    CIVIL WAR FROCK COAT, ARTILLERY

    This Union Frock Coat worn by a Civil War Artillery Officer is in very good, sound condition showing minor moth nips and missing one button, easily replaced. Fully laid out with "A" buttons for Artillery Service. Needs steaming to remove the wrinkles caused by over 100 years of being rolled up in a bunch inside of an old trunk. A couple of original Civil War Shoulder Boards would make this a great display coat. Artillery Coats are probably the rarest of service coats and highly sought after. This is an untouched, original Artillery Frock Coat.

    PRICE - $ 3,795.00


  13.  
    CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER, CANNON
    CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER, CANNON

    CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER, CANNON

    This is a wonderful Mountain Howitzer dated 1861, inspected and maker marked, "C. A. & Co. Boston" aka by Cyrus Alger of Boston. This Mountain Howitzer is nearly identical to those made by the Ames Company Foundry and together they supplied the majority of Mountain Howitzers during the Civil War. This example is in exceptional condition showing a beautiful nut-shell patina to the bronze tube. The carriage is a reproduction of course, and is also excellent. The 1841 Mountain Howitzer is a type of bronze smooth-bore 12 pounder optimized for firing explosive shells as well as spherical case and canister. It is light weight and highly portable. Because of this and its ease of dis-assembly, it could be quickly packed on 2 horses or mules that permitted their use with mounted forces in areas where roads were little more than paths or up steep slopes and mountainous areas. These small Howitzers provided artillery support for forces where it would otherwise be unavailable. This is the only piece of artillery that my wife allows in the house as the tube color matches her drapes in the living room. Lucky me! NOTE; I AM CURRENTLY LOOKING FOR 2 MORE OF THESE CANNONS WITH CARRIAGES IN SIMILAR CONDITION. IF YOU HAVE OR KNOW OF ONE THAT I MIGHT PURCHASE, LET'S TALK. I WOULD ALSO CONSIDER OTHER CIVIL WAR ARTILLERY PIECES. WE ARE LOOKING TO BUY SIX AND 12 POUNDER TUBES AS WELL AS RIFLED GUNS FROM THE CIVIL WAR.

    PRICE - Sale Pending !!! !!!


  14.  
    CIVIL WAR UNION FROCK COAT WITH STRAPS
    CIVIL WAR UNION FROCK COAT WITH STRAPS

    CIVIL WAR UNION FROCK COAT WITH STRAPS

    This Civil War Officers Frock Coat is nice, with a minimal amount of wear or age damage. It needs careful ironing and a single missing staff button (Steele & Johnson, easily replaced). It is in fine condition. Metal-backed Smith patent straps.

    PRICE - ON HOLD !!!


  15.  
    CIVIL WAR NAVAL OFFICERS SWORD, MEDAL-OF-HONOR
    CIVIL WAR NAVAL OFFICERS SWORD, MEDAL-OF-HONOR

    CIVIL WAR NAVAL OFFICERS SWORD, MEDAL-OF-HONOR

    This is a very rare bird. William Thompson was a signal quartermaster during the Civil War. His Medal-of-Honor Citation reads as follows, "The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Signal Quartermaster William Thompson, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism during action of the main squadron of ships against heavily defended Forts Beauregard and Walker on Hilton Head, South Carolina, 7 November 1861. Serving as Signal Quartermaster on board the U.S.S. Mohican, William Thompson steadfastly steered the ship with a steady and bold heart under the batteries; was wounded by a piece of shell but remained at his station until he fell from loss of blood. Legs since amputated." General Orders: War Department, General Order No. 17 (July 10, 1863). I don't have to tell many collectors how rare it is to find a wartime MOH winner. Call for details.

    PRICE - $ 13,750.00


  16.  
    CHARTER OAK COLT PRESENTATION CANE
    CHARTER OAK COLT PRESENTATION CANE

    CHARTER OAK COLT PRESENTATION CANE

    Here is one of the rarest artifacts I have ever offered and I hope some collector will appreciate it as such. This is a great historic American and Colt rarity that deserves someone to step up and have it restored. This cane was presented to General Caleb Cushing, a soldier, diplomat and politician during the 1840's - 1870's period. It was presented by the Democrats of Colt's Patent Firearms Company. It is fashioned from the famed "CHARTER OAK " and is so inscribed on one of its silver bands. The handle of the cane is carved in the form of an American Eagle's Head and the shaft is roughly 40" long. It is currently in 3 pieces and the shaft shows weathering and poor storage. Cushing served in the Massachusetts Legislature, served in Congress, served as a Colonel and Brigadier General in the Mexican War, and held high government offices. In 1843 President Tyler nominated Cushing for U.S. Secretary of the Treasury but he was not confirmed. He was appointed commissioner and United States Ambassador to China in 1843. He served as Attorney General in Franklin Pierce's Cabinet, presided over the Democratic National Convention in 1860 and was nominated for the Supreme Court in 1874. Cushing led an exciting life in one of the most exciting periods in American History. Any presentation by Colt, his workers or representatives of his establishment is rare and collectible. A presentation fashioned from the famed "Charter Oak" is almost impossible to find, and to additionally be presented to such a famous individual makes this cane a highly prized artifact. I think this price is quite reasonable and would note that there are 4 or 5 of these canes that were presented at the same time and one is pictured on the net as sold at auction. A restoration based on photos and specifications of the other cane is in order, and can probably be arrainged for the buyer of this rare Colt Presentation.

    PRICE - $4,750.00


  17.  
    SOLID GOLD CIVIL WAR CORPS BADGE
    SOLID GOLD CIVIL WAR CORPS BADGE

    SOLID GOLD CIVIL WAR CORPS BADGE

    This case contains the Coventry family archive of medals dating from the Civil War Corps Badge of Captain C. B. Coventry of the 24th New York Cavalry to other members of the Coventry family that served through WWII. The most valuable medal is of course the Solid Gold Corps Badge of Captain Coventry as presented to him from the non commissioned officers of the 24th New York Cavalry. The other medals and their owners still need to be researched. The wonderful Corps Badge has its recipients name on the front with crossed sabers motif with the top piece being engraved with battle honors of Cedar Mountain, Rappahannock Station, Thouroughfare Gap, Bull Run, Antietam and South Mountain. Coventry has a great service record having mustered into the 26th NY. Infantry in early 1861 as a private and working his way to Lieut. Colonel of the 24th NY Cavalry. In between his service with these two regiments, Coventry also served with the 157th (also as a Captain) who took extremely heavy losses at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. I don't have time to search the histories of the other medals and their service, but suffice to say I will not separate these family medals. They should be kept together and I will sell them that way. What the new owner chooses to do afterwards is up to them. A great Corps Badge Medal and history of a families service to their country.

    PRICE - $4,350.00


  18.  
    CIVIL WAR OFFICERS SPURS. EAGLE-HEAD
    CIVIL WAR OFFICERS SPURS. EAGLE-HEAD

    CIVIL WAR OFFICERS SPURS. EAGLE-HEAD

    This is the second time around for these spurs on our website as we just took them back in trade. One can argue that these may be one of the finest and most historical sets of spurs ever to come on the Civil War marketplace. This is the only known set of solid silver Eagles out of the Schuyler, Hartley and Graham catalog that I am aware of. Figural spurs such as these and Dolphin Heads are of the rarest and most desirable of known examples, far exceeding those of floral, geometric or plain design. Of course, the American Eagle is tops in all areas of Historical American collectables with military attribution. The Eagle is the iconic figure of American, and at the time, of The Union. In my opinion, these are the best of the best other than those which may be attributed to famous generals of the conflict such as Lee, Grant, etc. These full-form eagles with broad wings have been immaculately hand-chased after casting to produce the finest details. They are in nearly flat-mint condition. In addition, they are inscribed to a battle-worn officer who gave the ultimate at The Battle of the Wilderness in 1864. Both are inscribed, "Presented to Col. Alford B. Chapman by the enlisted men of his regiment, 57th N.Y.V. as a Souvenir of their regards and esteem. May 1864". Chapman served in the 7th NY Militia for 7 years prior to the outbreak of the war. He mustered into the 57th as a Captain in August of 1861 and participated at Fair Oaks, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Gaines Mill, Bull Run, and Antietam. He is metioned in the Regimental History in several of these engagements. He was promoted throughout these campaigns and became Lt. Colonel and Regimental Commander in the field after Col. Pierson fell mortally wounded at Antietam. During this battle, Captain Gilbert Frederick described the action that the 57th undertook; "The action was furious, the losses monstrous" as the 57th advanced on "Bloody Lane" (the Sunken Road) with the 66th following the Irish Brigade and finally over the ditch running, walking and stumbling over Rebel dead and wounded as they advanced and captured the colors of the 12th Alabama. General Hancock mentions Chapman in his official report on Antietam. Chapman was then heavily involved at the Battle of Fredericksburg, where it is noted in the Regimental history that during the fighting "Colonel Chapman stood by his horse and an orderly said to him, " Colonel, please don't expose yourself unnecessarily." Just then, a bullet struck the orderly on the right side cutting his suspenders and frizzling his flesh. He turned and said,"That was a providential escape." "Yes", said the Colonel and the next moment Chapman was struck, fatally it was thought, in the chest by a miniball. In his pocket were some folded letters and a blank book which stopped the mini from killing him. Horrific reports from the 57th at the battle speak of shells striking bodies of men and filling the air with pieces of flesh, clothing and accoutrements. One shell struck a man in the back, splitting him in two and sending his entrails flying in all directions. Major Throop, who led the 57th after the wounding of Chapman, was killed. Chapman and the 57th saw action at Chancellorsville, and at Gettysburg the 57th under Chapman were heavily engaged in the Wheatfield. At The Wilderness, Chapman had a premonition that he would not survive the day. At noon on the 5th of May, 1864 Chapman was ordered to take command of the skirmish line on the brigade front. He was engaged in these duties until 5 o'clock, when the line pushed forward directly into the path of Hill's Confederate Corps, beginning one of the most horrific and fiercest battles in history. As the 57th charged over the ground, they found Chapmans body on his back, a note clutched to his chest which read, " Dear Father I am mortally wounded. Do not grieve for me. My dearest love to all". The last words of the fallen hero, they are engraved on his tombstone in Greenwood Cemetery.

    PRICE - $15,000.00


  19.  
    CIVIL WAR CAMP HATCHET
    CIVIL WAR CAMP HATCHET

    CIVIL WAR CAMP HATCHET

    This is actually a very rare artifact as few of these have survived intact with such condition and originality. This is a camp hatchet as ordered by the Union from C. Hammond of Philadelphia, Pa. during the Civil War, and so marked. Hammond, among others, is listed as having supplied several thousand hatchet under government contracts. Thousands of these and similar hatchets were ordered and supplied to virtually every US and Volunteer unit that served. There are accounts of these used by riflemen similar to what the early settlers used and referred to as a tomahawk, and I'm sure a few were used and/or carried in battle. The trick is finding one with the original haft (handle) and in really fine condition. I have seen these sell complete for $600 - 700.00 retail, but always beat up or with replaced hafts. This hatchet is virtually attic mint. That is, it was never used or abused and put away safely to just age, like a fine wine. To find a hatchet in this condition is like finding an attic mint '63 musket that was never issued, just aged. A really nice artifact.

    PRICE - $ 850.00


  20.  
    Civil War Medal
    Civil War Medal

    Civil War Medal

    This is a lovely patriotic Civil War period medal made of coin silver presented to the top marksman of the Olden Rifles in 1861. The Olden Rifles were from Lawrence, New Jersey and were formed May 31, 1861 after Lincoln's call for 75,000 troops. They were named after Governor Olden of New Jersey. Further research is needed on this medal as the recipient could be of some importance. Recipient of the medal remains unknown.

    PRICE - $ 1,475.00

 

Items 1 to 20 of 110 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5