Antique Long Arms

Appraiser and Dealer of Antique Rifles, Muskets, Carbines, Cannons and Accessories manufactured before 1899.

We buy, sell and trade all models of Antique Long Arms to include Rifles made by New Haven Arms, Henry, Sharps, Springfield and Harpers Ferry as well as European guns. We provide information, estimates of value, formal appraisals and authentication services on single items or entire collections. Contact us for details.




Items 1 to 20 of 110 total

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  1.  
    AMES CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER
    AMES CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER

    AMES CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER

    This is a great 1841 Model Ames Foundry 12 lb. Mountain Howitzer on reproduction carriage. These are probably the most desirable field piece among collectors today due to their relatively small stature, classic construction and general history. It shows wonderful condition with beautiful markings. I have a similar example in my office and these are just spectacular display and conversation pieces. When used as a giant shotgun at crucial locations, a pair of 12 pounders could be used with devastating effect to scatter hundreds of 1" lead balls at high velocity upon the enemy. They were used by both North and South with this one dated 1863, certainly issued to the North. Several were captured by both sides and turned against the original bearers. In my opinion, this is the optimum Civil War Collectible. I'd rather have 1 of these monsters in my display room than an entire wall of muskets. I cannot stress how difficult it is to find these smaller guns. Only a handful have been offered in the past ten years and I have been lucky enough that this is my third offering. There is no charge for delivery on this gun East of the Mississippi but a surcharge of an addition $500.00+ to the west of that point (depending on location). A similar gun with NO CARRIAGE sold at auction recently for over $64,000.00. A carriage runs about $8,000 - $10,000.00. That means only an Ames Mountain Howitzer tube sold for almost $65k and it was in no better condition than this one. Shop and compare, then check out our other field pieces throughout the pages of this website.

    PRICE - $56,500.00


  2.  
    INDIAN TRADE GUN, HUDSON BAY
    INDIAN TRADE GUN, HUDSON BAY

    INDIAN TRADE GUN, HUDSON BAY

    Here is a good and completely untouched (since an old previous cleaning) Indian trade gun that came to us over the summer with a few other artifacts. This gun came out of The Winnipeg, Canada Area, home to Fort Garry, a trading hub for the Hudson Bay Company. Established in 1822, Fort Garry played a major role in not only the Fur Trade, but was central to the administration of the HBC and the surrounding settlements. I want to be perfectly clear as to what this gun looks like. It is ugly to the layman, but might appear to be a diamond in the rough to a wise collector. Although this gun is complete and with no alterations, it shows a very old cleaning that was then varnished to preserve both metal and wood surfaces. It looks like it had some splashes of crust on it that were cleaned down. Some of the markings are virtually perfect including a Hudson Bay stamp with the running fox. However the metal parts are now heavily stained and there is still some pitting scattered across the barrel. Some areas are bright and some blackish, giving the gun a blotchy look that's not very appealing, but there's a future here. The steel parts need to be stripped of the old varnish and browned to even out the finish which would then make the gun quite presentable. The wood is in very nice condition with only a single repair towards the muzzle end. It too, has the same thick varnish covering its surface which needs to be removed and has scattered discoloration. It's in original flintlock and the gun just needs a little TLC. This is a relatively rare gun and one that has never been messed with other than this old cleaning and varnishing which was obviously applied to help preserve it. It's sort of like the girl you didn't want to date in high school and then saw at your 10 year reunion that blew the cheerleaders away. If you're still single, this one (like the girl), would be a good one to chase. It's a project, but the results of a good effort could be rewarding. This gun was most likely carried by one of the Indians of the area, possibly Assiniboine or "Stone Sioux", who were originally part of the Great Sioux Nation. The Assiniboine were close allies and trading partners of the Cree, engaging in wars together against the Atsina (Gros Ventre). Together they later fought the Blackfoot. A Great Plains people, they generally went no further north than the North Saskatchewan River. They purchased a great deal of European trade goods from the Hudson's Bay Company through Cree middlemen, this gun probably included. This is a nice find and very moderately priced.

    PRICE - $ 4,250.00


  3.  
    AMES 6-POUNDER BRONZE CIVIL WAR CANNON
    AMES 6-POUNDER BRONZE CIVIL WAR CANNON

    AMES 6-POUNDER BRONZE CIVIL WAR CANNON

    One of my all-time favorite Civil War Artifacts is the classic 6-pounder cannon of Bronze. Although most of us can never afford one, many of us are aware of the chill it gives us when visiting a museum or better yet, a battlefield site where they can be found on display. This rare gun is in wonderful condition and fully marked and inspected. It was cast by the Ames Foundry in 1855. These guns were heavily used before, during and after the Mexican War, but by 1863 were just about out of vogue with the Union who preferred the 12-pounder Napoleon. Not so with the Confederates, who had to garner any and all artillery they could find, obsolete or not. They were loaded with 6 pounders such as this and valued them highly. Virtually any pre-1861 dated 6 pounder could have been used by Confederate forces. The carriage on this gun is a wonderful reproduction in very good condition (there are but a handfull of originals known to exist). The tube shows very little corrosion and a great green patina forming about the gun. I can recall the first few times I visited the Gettysburg Battlefield Park and waking up on the foggy summer mornings to go into town for breakfast on the Taneytown Pike. The cannons scattered across the misty landscape would give me chills. They remain a site to behold to this day and hopefully, shall remain so. I recommend that anyone that's never been to Gettysburg to not only put it on your bucket list, put it at the top while you're young enough to march through the historic fields and still have fresh legs. If you like American History, there's nothing else like it. If you can't make it to Gettysburg or another park, you probably need to buy this gun to get the same effect. Not recommend for those that love apartment living.

    PRICE - $72,500.00


  4.  
    VOLCANIC PISTOL CARBINE, HOLSTER, AMBRO-TYPE, INSCRIBED
    VOLCANIC PISTOL CARBINE, HOLSTER, AMBRO-TYPE, INSCRIBED

    VOLCANIC PISTOL CARBINE, HOLSTER, AMBRO-TYPE, INSCRIBED

    When it comes to finding a great rarity, this one will be hard to beat. This is a rare 16" Volcanic Pistol, a very difficult to find variation of the large brass-frame Volcanic. It is accompanied with its original, matching numbered attachable shoulder stock. It's in wonderful, untouched condition.That in itself makes it a very desirable and top of the charts antique arm that any collector would proudly add to his collection at a handsome price. It doesn't end there though. It is accompanied with its original double compartment holster, with one side form-fitted to hold its excellent condition pistol and the other for the near mint condition shoulder stock. But wait,,,, the holster is embossed with the word 'Volcanic" on its strap, PLUS it's numbered to the gun and stock! Hold on,,,, there's more! It is accompanied with an ambro-type of a man holding the pistol! Think it couldn't get any better than this???? It does! There's a coin silver inlay on the right grip that reads, "W. C. Dodge". Dodge was a U.S. patent attorney who wrote a pamphlet during the Civil War describing the features and benefits of rapid-fire breech loading rifles to the military. He was one of the main champions of the Henry Rifle. A factory engraved (Nimschke Style) brass-framed Briggs Patent Rifle was presented to Dodge by the New Haven Arms Company in 1865 in recognition of his efforts and was sold at auction in California a few years ago for $220,000.00. One could easily assume that this particular Volcanic Pistol/Carbine was the apple of Dodge's eye that spread the seeds of realization concerning the distinct advantages of lever-action breech loaders. This is obviously one of the single most important discoveries ever to come to light concerning the Winchester Family of Arms, unquestionably worthy of the finest museum or personal gun collection. This outfit is not for sale but I thought it appropriate to share it with our website readers. I hope to be able to display it at a gun show in the future, possibly in Las Vegas, Denver or one of Ron Dickson's fine shows in Louisville.

    PRICE - Although this set is not for sale, I will consider trade offers of high condition, Cased Colt Percussion Revolvers with proper Colt marked accessories or other Quality Artifacts with pre-1865 Historical Content.


  5.  
    CIVIL WAR ARTILLERY GUNNERS LEVEL
    CIVIL WAR ARTILLERY GUNNERS LEVEL

    CIVIL WAR ARTILLERY GUNNERS LEVEL

    This is a Watervliet Arsenal marked Artillery Gunners Level, also known as a "Perpendicular". There were used by Artillery men for sighting their artillery pieces. Fabricated of heavy brass, this example shows crisp maker’s markings of a Patriotic Eagle over “U.S. / WATERTOWN / ARSENAL / 1856” and is in near mint condition. At one time this piece appears to have been polished and now has a darkening patine. I don't know how they looked when new, but this shows such faint amount of use that the finish could be original. It's the best one I've ever seen and with an early date. Perfect to compliment an artillery collection or to go with one of the great cannons on the pages of this website.

    PRICE - $ 1,500.00


  6.  
    CIVIL WAR CANNON, IRON 6-POUNDER
    CIVIL WAR CANNON, IRON 6-POUNDER

    CIVIL WAR CANNON, IRON 6-POUNDER

    This is a very strong condition iron six-pounder cannon barrel made by the Fort Pitt Iron Foundry and dated 1836. The Fort Pitt Foundry was a nineteenth-century iron foundry in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, originally established at Fifth Avenue and Smithfield Street in 1804 by Joseph McClurg. The muzzle face of this cannon is inspected “J.W.R” (James Wolfe Ripley) and “18″. Left trunnion is dated 1836, right trunnion is marked "Mc. W. & Co." and "P.P.F." standing for McClurg, Wade & Co., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania Foundry. This is a model 1834 tube, one of only a very few that survived testing and use, this with possible Seminole War and/or Mexican War service. The tube shows decorative bands and its cascabel has a horizontal hole of about 1/2″ dia. for bolting to the elevating screw. The rear face of the tube is additionally marked "U*S*RESERVE, Corner No. 3", the tube undoubtedly mounted at some fort, probably during the Mexican or Civil War as a boundary marker. The barrel is in fine condition for an early cast iron piece, showing no evidence of severe pitting and no layered paint. The surface is relatively smooth with fresh surface rust that could be easily cleaned and then painted. If the price of a bronze gun gives you dry heaves, this could be a candidate for a personal or museum collection, easily mounted on a Number 2 carriage.

    PRICE - $21,500.00


  7.  
    KENTUCKY RIFLE - SHEETZ
    KENTUCKY RIFLE - SHEETZ

    KENTUCKY RIFLE - SHEETZ

    This is a really nice little Kentucky Rifle from a famous family of makers. It appears to be in the style of the Sheetz family members who were a prominent rifle-making family from Virginia for several generations. This is one of the later guns and somewhat diminutive in size. It is just under 54" long with a 39 1/2" barrel of 32 caliber. It only has a 12" pull from the inside curve of the butt-plate, so I feel like this may have been a young boys first rifle. It has very nice curly maple showing an 8" sliver repair on the left side near the muzzle mixed with a little wood putty and a 6 inch sliver repair on the right side, forward of the lock. I can find no breaks or cracks anywhere else in the wood. It appears to have never been cut and with a little bit of tidying up, will be a very presentable and historic old Virginia Kentucky for up over someone's fireplace.

    PRICE - $ 3,750.00


  8.  
    NORTH AND SKINNER REVOLVING RIFLE FOR SALE
    NORTH AND SKINNER REVOLVING RIFLE FOR SALE

    NORTH AND SKINNER REVOLVING RIFLE FOR SALE

    This is a rare, North & Skinner Six shot revolving rifle manufactured by H.S. North and Edward Savage of Middletown, Connecticut, c. 1856-1859. Total production is estimated at about 600 rifles. This fine condition and relatively rare rifle has a combination trigger guard/cocking lever, external self-cocking hammer and partial shield that covers the top and front of the cylinder. The top barrel flat is stamped "NORTH & SAVAGE MIDDLETOWN CONN. CAST STEEL" in one line. "PATENTED JUNE 1" 1852" is roll-stamped on the right barrel flat. The markings, edges and action are all very fine and the metal is a gray patina. The wood is also very nice with most of its original varnish remaining. It is estimated that only a few hundred of these revolving rifles were manufactured and it is very difficult to find one in decent condition. A completely re-finished gun with a few missing parts and screws sold at auction a few years ago for over $6,000. No collection of revolving rifles would be complete without one of these guns, and this is a good one.

    PRICE - $ 3,950.00


  9.  
    CIVIL WAR MORTAR FOR SALE
    CIVIL WAR MORTAR FOR SALE

    CIVIL WAR MORTAR FOR SALE

    This is a beautiful condition, 24-pound Coehorn Mortar made by Cyrus Alger. It has a beautiful patina and strong, crisp markings with inspector marks. It is dated 1863 and weighs in at 170 pounds, serial number 45 for that year. These mortars were mounted on a wooden base with 4 handles for easy handling on and off wagons. They were used by both Northern and Southern troops during the war with great effect and are one of the most popular pieces of artillery in the collecting field due to there size, which allows collectors to place them in most any office or gun room.

    PRICE - $32,750.00 including delivery.


  10.  
    KENTUCKY RIFLE BY JOHN PARKS.
    KENTUCKY RIFLE BY JOHN PARKS.

    KENTUCKY RIFLE BY JOHN PARKS.

    Kentucky Long Rifles like this are seldom seen for sale anymore. This fine gun is untouched, right out-of-the-woods and it's enormous. It sports an octagon to round barrel measuring a full 52" of 56 caliber rifled bore and is a whopping 67" over-all. This is exactly how one would hope to find a Kentucky rifle, showing no evidence that it ever did anything after its period of use other than hang above someone's fireplace or sit in an attic waiting for someone to come love it. The metal parts are attached to an impressive piece of curly maple which shows some tasteful carving of c-scroll patterns behind the cheek-piece. Checkerboarding at the intersection of the scrolls shows little wear and there's a nice little half-moon inlay on the cheek. The side-plates show nice form as does the patch-box which shows sparse engraving. The gun has been converted to cap & ball and this gun would look awesome if converted to flintlock. There is a wonderful wire repair to the wrist that I would definitely leave alone as it does nothing but add character and story-telling to the gun. This is a beauty with great potential.

    PRICE - $4,350.00


  11.  
    CIVIL WAR 3-INCH ORDNANCE RIFLE,CANNON
    CIVIL WAR 3-INCH ORDNANCE RIFLE,CANNON

    CIVIL WAR 3-INCH ORDNANCE RIFLE,CANNON

    This is a great condition 3-inch ordnance rifle manufactured by The Phoenix Iron Company and dated 1865. These rifles were the most widely used gun during the Civil War. Invented by John Griffen, it was extremely durable, with the barrel made of wrought iron. This one has all the bells and whistles to include all markings and inspection marks as well as the U. S. Surcharge and issue date stampings. The outside of the tube is smooth and crisp and the inside shows strong rifling. The gun is for sale with a brand-new wooden carriage made to exact specifications with the tube re-painted, or the tube can be sold as-is in the photo. The gun will look like the one pictured on a similar carriage in our photo file. I have also included a wartime photo of one of these guns in our file. The Phoenix Iron Company of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania was the largest producer of these guns. There are few cases on record of any of these tubes fracturing or bursting and they were exceptionally accurate. During the Battle of Atlanta, a Confederate gunner was quoted: "The Yankee three-inch rifle was a dead shot at any distance under a mile. They could hit the end of a flour barrel more often than miss, unless the gunner got rattled." This is a really great piece that could be yours.

    PRICE - $40,000 complete with Paint and Carriage, ($32,500.00 tube only, as pictured)


  12.  
    1866 WINCHESTER RIFLE, HISTORICALLY INSCRIBED - COLLECTIBLE ANTIQUE GUNS
    1866 WINCHESTER RIFLE, HISTORICALLY INSCRIBED - COLLECTIBLE ANTIQUE GUNS

    1866 WINCHESTER RIFLE, HISTORICALLY INSCRIBED - COLLECTIBLE ANTIQUE GUNS

    Here's another great item that we sold many years ago and has now come back to us after spending the last 17 years or so on a wall in Nebraska. This is a really fine gun in terms of the careful way it's been handled since its period of use. It has a wonderful and bold inscription on the left side of its frame that reads, "L. Havens from J.Mc.A.Jr.". Whoever "L. Havens" was, he used this gun but was careful in maintaining its condition. It's hard to judge the actual percentage of blue on it barrel and magazine tube because it's blending so perfectly with a plum, blue-brown patina. I'd estimate it at 70% on the barrel and tube, which some of it aged. It has a beautiful aged brass frame and all the metal is free of the usual nicks and dings. The edges, action and all markings are sharp and crisp and the wood retains most all of its finish. Taking into account that it is historically inscribed combined with its super condition warrants its worthiness into the finest of Winchester Collections. It will take some doing to identify whose names are on this gun but if one is patient and good at it, I believe it can be done, adding considerably to its value. I was told when I originally found this gun that there were one or two other presented by the same man on the same date, so he must have been a man of some means during the period. If you know of any other guns presented by an "J.Mc.A. Jr.", please contact me.

    PRICE - SALE PENDING !!!!!


  13.  
    CIVIL WAR BURNSIDE CARBINE, IDENTIFIED TO ALABAMA SOLDIER
    CIVIL WAR BURNSIDE CARBINE, IDENTIFIED TO ALABAMA SOLDIER

    CIVIL WAR BURNSIDE CARBINE, IDENTIFIED TO ALABAMA SOLDIER

    You won't find a Civil War Carbine like this at most Civil War shows or at an auction. I've had this for a few years and am thinning out the herd to make room for a few recent acquisitions to my own collection. This Burnside Carbine was sent in here as an untouched relic found in the barn of a farm in Virginia in the 1950's that was being re-built, and then kept in a closet until it was sold to me. It is carved on one side "SEVEN PINES" (with a backwards "N") and "C. W. Sayers", "ALa" on the other. The gun does not look as good in person as it does in the photos, especially the wood, which is heavily aged. It is in the 8XXX range and is an early 4th model. This particular gun had more of an impact on me than most others, and with good reason. I searched the wrong name on the internet for 2 hours and almost went insane. I mis-spelled "SAYRE" as "SAYER" and couldn't find any Alabama soldier of that name that was at Seven Pines. Then I allowed my better half to try and she found him in 30 seconds. In any case, C. W. Sayre was in the 3rd Alabama and was indeed at Seven Pines. That's not to say that this gun was carried by Sayre in the Battle of Seven Pines. He could have gotten the gun long after and carved his remembrance of that battle as was done on many flags of the South. The 3rd regiment was organized at Montgomery in April 1861, and was the first Alabama command that went to Virginia. Mustered into service at Lynchburg, May 4, the regiment was ordered to Norfolk. It was merged with the First and Twelfth Virginia, under Col. Withers, later succeeded by Col. Mahone. It remained at Norfolk for a year but saw no active service. At Seven Pines it was held in reserve the first day; but was badly cut up the second, losing 38 killed and 122 wounded. A fortnight later it was attached to Rodes' brigade which now consisted of the Third, Fifth, Sixth, Twelfth, and Twenty-sixth of Alabama regiments. The brigade, led by Col. J.B. Gordon of the Sixth, participated in the week of battle before Richmond, as part of D.H. Hill's division. The Third lost 207 out of 345 men and officers at the bloody repulse of Malvern Hill, and mustered with only 180 men a few days after that terrible conflict, but soon recruited to 300. The Third Alabama was the first to the plant the "stars and bars" on the hills of Maryland. At Boonsboro the fighting was prolonged and desperate, as it was at Sharpsburg. It moved back into Virginia with the army, and was in line of battle at Fredericksburg. At Chancellorsville it shared prominently in the glories achieved by Jackson's corps in the splendid assault on Hooker, and in the two days lost 24 killed, and 125 wounded. In the second Maryland campaign, the Third moved with Ewell's corps, to which it now belonged, as far as Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. It lost heavily at Gettysburg, fighting both days with much credit, and shared in the privations of the retreat. After the return to Virginia, it skirmished at Mine Run and bore a conspicuous part in the battles of Wilderness and Spottsylvania, losing very severely. In the fighting at the second Cold Harbor, it charged the enemy's breastworks, and lost considerably. It was with Early in the Valley, and in Maryland, taking part in the demonstration against Washington, and in the pursuit of Hunter. At Winchester its loss was heavy, and it suffered severely at Cedar Hill, but protected the rear of the retreating army. Placed in the trenches at Petersburg, the Third dwindled away by attrition till only about 40 laid down their arms at Appomatox. Of 1651 names on its roll, about 260 perished in battle, 119 died in the service, and 605 were discharged or transferred. This is an untouched, out-of-the-woods prize for any collector. The metal retains a heavy, crusty brown patina that needs a coat of oil to arrest any further corrosion, but I've been afraid to touch it. I liked it just the way I found it and it has remained that way in my safe. The wood is also a dark patina and with a loop, shows the 150 year old crud, dirt and age in the carvings. The breech-block is frozen and the rear sight is missing. If you like bright and shiny condition guns, this may not be for you. But if you like a gun that talks, that is identified as being once carried by a Confederate and is untouched, this gun screams at you.

    PRICE - $6,500.00


  14.  
    HISTORIC CONFEDERATE ENFIELD RIFLE
    HISTORIC CONFEDERATE ENFIELD RIFLE

    HISTORIC CONFEDERATE ENFIELD RIFLE

    Here is is a world-class Confederate Civil War Artifact. This is a rare, South Carolina surcharged 3-band Enfield Rifle with unquestionably authentic Confederate use and capture tag. The bombardment of Fort Sumter was the first military action of the American Civil War. Following the surrender, Northerners rallied behind Lincoln's call for all states to send troops to recapture the forts and preserve the Union. The next 4 years were arduous and bloody for both North and South. Charleston Harbor was completely in Confederate hands for almost the entire four-year duration of the war, leaving a hole in the Union naval blockade. Union forces conducted major operations in 1862 and 1863 to capture Charleston, first overland on James Island (the Battle of Secessionville, June 1862), then by naval assault against Fort Sumter (the First Battle of Charleston Harbor, April 1863), then by seizing the Confederate artillery positions on Morris Island (beginning with the Second Battle of Fort Wagner, July 1863, and followed by a siege until September). After pounding Sumter to rubble with artillery fire, a final amphibious operation attempted to occupy it (the Second Battle of Fort Sumter, September 1863), but the effort was repulsed and no further attempts were made. The Confederates evacuated Fort Sumter and Charleston in February 1865 as Union Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman outflanked the city in the Carolinas Campaign. On April 14, 1865, four years to the day after lowering the Fort Sumter Flag in surrender, Robert Anderson (by then a major general, although ill and in retired status) returned to the ruined fort to raise the flag he had lowered in 1861. This beautiful condition Enfield Rifle has a lock marked "Barnett - London". The stock is marked "R. G. Fraser" opposite the lock which is probably a stock makers mark. It shows an "SC" surcharge stamping (for South Carolina) on the right butt-stock and has an original capture tag glued in front of that stamp that reads, "Add Langdon, From W. A. Whitcomb, Late of the U. S. S. "Massachusetts", South Atlantic Squadron, Taken from Ft. Sumter, February 20, 1865". This tag is period and 100% authentic. I have found Whitcomb in the records but have not had a chance to perform additional research at the time of this writing other than finding that the U. S. S. Massachusetts was indeed at the capture of Fort Sumter and was serving in the South Atlantic Squadron during that period. One of the most historic Confederate finds we have ever offered.

    PRICE - $15,000.00 - SALE PENDING !!!


  15.  
    1861 SPRINGFIELD RIFLE MUSKET
    1861 SPRINGFIELD RIFLE MUSKET

    1861 SPRINGFIELD RIFLE MUSKET

    This is an extremely fine condition Model 1861 Springfield Rifle-Musket dated 1862 on barrel and lock-plate. The gun was obviously very tastefully cleaned at one time as evidenced by a few small areas of roughness, but it was done correctly. The fit and finish of all metal arts is about perfect. All markings edges and action are excellent to include 2 near perfect cartouches on an excellent condition stock. About 60 - 70% original blue on the rear sight.

    PRICE - $3,675.00 ! !


  16.  
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    KENTUCKY RIFLE BY YOUNG, LEHIGH COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA

    This is a fine Kentucky Rifle that looks like it may be from the Lehigh County area of Pennsylvania and possibly made by a member of the Young family of makers. This is a no-excuses Kentucky Rifle that has never been messed with or cleaned and is all original save for a conversion to cap & ball.

    PRICE - $4,475.00


  17.  
    CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER, CANNON
    CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER, CANNON

    CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER, CANNON

    This is a wonderful Mountain Howitzer dated 1861, inspected and maker marked, "C. A. & Co. Boston" aka by Cyrus Alger of Boston. This Mountain Howitzer is nearly identical to those made by the Ames Company Foundry and together they supplied the majority of Mountain Howitzers during the Civil War. This example is in exceptional condition showing a beautiful nut-shell patina to the bronze tube. The carriage is a reproduction of course, and is also excellent. The 1841 Mountain Howitzer is a type of bronze smooth-bore 12 pounder optimized for firing explosive shells as well as spherical case and canister. It is light weight and highly portable. Because of this and its ease of dis-assembly, it could be quickly packed on 2 horses or mules that permitted their use with mounted forces in areas where roads were little more than paths or up steep slopes and mountainous areas. These small Howitzers provided artillery support for forces where it would otherwise be unavailable. This is the only piece of artillery that my wife allows in the house as the tube color matches her drapes in the living room. Lucky me! NOTE; I AM CURRENTLY LOOKING FOR 2 MORE OF THESE CANNONS WITH CARRIAGES IN SIMILAR CONDITION. IF YOU HAVE OR KNOW OF ONE THAT I MIGHT PURCHASE, LET'S TALK. I WOULD ALSO CONSIDER OTHER CIVIL WAR ARTILLERY PIECES. WE ARE LOOKING TO BUY SIX AND 12 POUNDER TUBES AS WELL AS RIFLED GUNS FROM THE CIVIL WAR.

    PRICE - Sale Pending !!! !!!


  18.  
    FLINTLOCK KENTUCKY RIFLE
    FLINTLOCK KENTUCKY RIFLE


  19.  
    FLINTLOCK MUSKET OR "FUSIL", JOHN HILLS
    FLINTLOCK MUSKET OR "FUSIL", JOHN HILLS

    FLINTLOCK MUSKET OR "FUSIL", JOHN HILLS

    This is a great little musket by one of the "Hills Brothers". No, not the guys who made coffee, but the premier family of gunmakers in Connecticut during the 18th century. John and Medad Hills were sons of Benoni Hills, and all 3 are now very well known for producing some of the finest muskets both before and during the Revolutionary War. All 3 served as officers in Militia units during that time. Many of their products are signed and dated and a slight few are adorned with patriotic motifs such as "LIBERTY OR DEATH". Such examples are extremely rare, of the most desirable arms of that period and quite valuable even in poor condition. This example is an outstanding little gun that shows earmarks of a John Hills gun in terms of its architecture, style of carving to the barrel tang and engraving on its brass mounts. It is in extremely fine condition and a conversion back to flintlock by a good smith will resurrect this fine gun to its proper status.

    PRICE - $ 4,850.00


  20.  
    KENTUCKY RIFLE BY JACOB ROOP
    KENTUCKY RIFLE BY JACOB ROOP

    KENTUCKY RIFLE BY JACOB ROOP

    Kentucky Rifles of this quality and size seem to be getting a lot of attention in the past few years. All I can say is, "IT'S ABOUT TIME"! Now, this gun isn't by one of the Masters of "The Golden Age of Kentucky Rifles", however it could certainly be called the masterpiece of this particular maker, and much of the workmanship could remind one of the work of Martin or John Shell. This gun is signed in small delicate script "J. ROOP" on the barrel. I have seen only a few guns marked with this name, usually much smaller in stature. I'm sure many of the collectors out there have rifles marked J. Roop as well. However I don't think they've seen one quite like this, and I think that's because Roop built Kentucky Rifles for many years and as with most makers that contiued their trade for many years, Kentuckies seemed to down-size throughout their evolution in North America. (Still listed as a maker in the 1840's in Weaton, Indiana). He also had two sons, Jacob and John that may have been involved in the riflemaking trade. Jacob Sr. was born in Lancaster County, Pa. in 1779 and certainly completed his apprentice work by the turn of the century, if not in the late 1790's, in time to be classified as a "Golden Age Maker". He originally operated North of York, Pa. and is listed in the tax lists of 1805 in Dauphin County, Pa. This Flintlock Kentucky Rifle is a monster, measuring a full 68 & 1/2" overall with a 53"+ round, smoothbore barrel of .60 caliber. When found, this gun showed heavy weathering to the wood to a light straw to its high-points which have since been colored to match the finish that was still present forward of the lock-plate. Other than that, it is all original including the lock which is in its original flintlock configuration with no repair or conversion. It shows incised carving to each side of the fore-end and behind the rear ramrod pipe, C-scroll relief carving behind the barrel-tang, raised carving to the rear of each side of the wrist. Beaver tails at the back end of each side of the lock and in front of the comb, raised vine and scroll carving to the cheekpiece to include a delicate flower. It also has eight barrel keys of silver or German Silver, a silver thub-piece, engraved silver star inlay to the cheekpiece and a stylized Bowie-Knife in brass at the top edge of the cheek. A great gun for a nice collection of Kentucky Rifles or maybe a one-gun collection over the fireplace.

    PRICE - PRICE - $25,000

 

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