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Items 1 to 20 of 438 total

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  1.  
    COLT WALKER REVOLVER HOLSTER
    COLT WALKER REVOLVER HOLSTER

    COLT WALKER REVOLVER HOLSTER

    I don't suppose I have to describe how rare this holster is, but I'll do it anyway. I've seen two military style flap-holsters for the Colt Walker, two civilians that were very nice and two sets of pommel holsters that were bonafide originals. Everything else I've seen has been extremely questionable. This one is an absolute no-brainer, and it is world-class in terms of form, artistry and condition. When I first received photos of this holster, I couldn't tell exactly what it was other than the fact that it swallowed up a Dragoon in the photo. I was pretty sure that it was for an 8" Dragoon or a Walker. When it came in, I tried an 8" and it swallowed that as well, with the hammer dropping an inch into the holster, an absolute no-no as that hammer spur would have torn the holster up in no time. I then shipped it off to a Walker owner and lo-and-behold, we found ourselves one of the great rarities in Colt Accessories. The Colt Walker is the only gun I know of that fits this rig properly. The carving and bordering is exquisite, with about the finest detail I've ever seen on any early holster regardless of origin or period. This holster isn't just carved, it's a combination of incised and relief carving and rivals the height and grandness of that on a fine, Golden Age Kentucky Rifle. The entire field of display is carved with a single flower stem, starting at the muzzle and rising with larger and more detailed foliage of leaf clusters and stems to terminate at the breech end with a large flower, possibly a Texas Rose. Lined backgrounds adorn each leaf and a simulated punch-dot background is scattered in other areas. The bordering is extremely detailed and the coverage is virtually 100% on the front side. The back-side shows some of the same bordering but the rest of the panel is absent of decoration. The leather is in wonderful condition and is softer than one would expect, probably due to age and a breakdown of leather fibers over time. I would expect that it was quite stiff originally. The plug is missing and that doesn't surprise me. This is not a slim-jim type holster that was closely form-fit. To hold a revolver the size and weight of a Walker, form-fitting at the front of the cylinder and trigger-guard would have distributed the weight of the gun better. I would expect that the plug blew-out on this holster within a few months of carry, and that's probably why it remained in such wonderful condition over the years. It's original belt loop is still on the back and there's an additional scabbard loop on the front that shows it was definitely used to hold a dirk or small Bowie. The rub lines from a sheath are still present. The interior is lined but now torn and creased in several areas and deteriorating. This may have been padded with raw cotton or other media originally. Walkers were a big heavy gun and issued with pommel-holsters. All those government issued guns ended up with Texas Rangers and frontiersmen as well as in the California gold-fields. They didn't wear pommel holsters with a waist-belt, so a fine Martial Revolver would be just as appropriate with this rig as a Civilian Gun. All in all and in my opinion, this is one of the rarest and finest antique holsters ever discovered. Several years ago there was an original Walker Revolver in very good to fine condition that was period engraved. It was in an auction in California. If you know who currently owns that gun, please let him know I have a holster for him. That, or buy a great piece of Antique American leatherwork to park your own Walker in.

    PRICE - $25,000.00


  2.  
    CIVIL WAR CARTRIDGE BOX WITH ORIGINAL STRAP AND PLATES
    CIVIL WAR CARTRIDGE BOX WITH ORIGINAL STRAP AND PLATES

    CIVIL WAR CARTRIDGE BOX WITH ORIGINAL STRAP AND PLATES

    This is a really nice condition and early Civil War era Cartridge Box with its original canvas strap, probably issued to Militia early in the Civil War. It is 100% original, dirty and dusty as it came to us directly from a widow who had no idea who in her family originally owned it. The leather is in very good condition and the strap is about perfect. One of the fastener buckles is very loos and needs a good glue or epoxy repair before it breaks off. Both buckles are original to the box and strap and have never been touched and retain their natural patina. This is a really nice rig.

    PRICE - $ 1,375.00 - SALE PENDING !


  3.  
    Antique Colt 1860 Army Revolver
    Antique Colt 1860 Army Revolver

    Antique Colt 1860 Army Revolver

    This is a relatively rare Colt 1860 Army Revolver with large "US" stamping to its trigger-guard and mixed-number, re-conditioning and assembly for issue to US Cavalry troops after the Civil War. These "US" marked Colts are reported to have been used by the 9th and 10th US Cavalry in Texas and the West as issued to African American Troopers among others. This one shows heavy use but is still functional and priced appropriately. It shows a gray patina with no cylinder scene left. It is missing the wedge and wedge-screw. There is a hole in one of the cylinder stops. I would guess it probably blew out the stop as that is where the metal is thinnest on the chambers of the cylinder. It could probably be fixed without too much trouble.

    PRICE - $ 875.00 - SALE PENDING !


  4.  
    VOLCANIC PISTOL, SMALL-FRAME SMITH & WESSON
    VOLCANIC PISTOL, SMALL-FRAME SMITH & WESSON

    VOLCANIC PISTOL, SMALL-FRAME SMITH & WESSON

    This is hands-down, one of the best Small-Frame Smith & Wesson Volcanic Pistols brought to market in the past 20 years. It retains about 75 - 85% original blue brown finish that is still vivid on its barrel and magazine and 30% blue on its frame. This original finish is blending naturally with a perfect plumb-brown patina. The grips are near mint retailing virtually all of their shiny varnish. The action, edges and markings are near perfect. There is the slightest bit of corrosion near the muzzle end of the barrel. It appears that this corrosion probably extended to the face of the muzzle as the face shows a recent cleaning. The tiny pin-tab on the face of the magazine is a replacement and I therefore believe this is an area that was corroded, possibly frozen or broken and is why these issues were addressed. If you blow-up the photos, you'll see the thin tab that has been replaced. I don't believe that this hurts the gun much as about 1/3 of these early guns I see have the replaced tab. I have only seen a handful of these guns in better condition in 35 years and those have sold in the $30,000 - $50,000 range.

    PRICE - $ 24,500.00


  5.  
    GETTYSBURG ARTIFACT - IDENTIFIED FIRST MINNESOTA SWORD
    GETTYSBURG ARTIFACT - IDENTIFIED FIRST MINNESOTA SWORD

    GETTYSBURG ARTIFACT - IDENTIFIED FIRST MINNESOTA SWORD

    We've been very fortunate to have found some great artifacts over the years. I often refer to an item being "One of the Best" or "One of the Rarest'. I'll let you be the judge on this one but I'm not going to talk much about the sword as the fine artifact that it is, but of its illustrious history. It belonged to a man named John Peller. John Peller was born in Heidelberg, Germany on February 5, 1830. He probably arrived in America while a very young boy. By his excellent penmanship and command of the English language one would expect that his education was received in the United States. He came to Cannon City, (now Cannon Falls, MN) in 1855. He moved to Hastings in 1859. He worked as a merchant with Thorne, Norrish & Co until the beginning of the war, when he went to St Paul to enlist. He enlisted in Company A, First Minnesota Infantry in October of 1861. He was 31 and stood 5' 8 1/2" tall mustering in as a sergeant. In 1862, he was discharged to receive a commission as 2nd lieutenant of Company A and on January 13, 1863 he was promoted to 1st lieutenant and adjutant of the regiment. As adjutant he was responsible for the official correspondence and monthly muster rolls of the regiment. His experience as a merchant served him well here. The documents of the regiment show his clear and careful penmanship. Peller and the remnants of the First were in the ranks at Gettysburg. They were a veteran unit, losing nearly 200 in killed and wounded at Bull Run and another 200 at Antietam. They were hardened, with their ranks severely reduced in numbers. At a quarter before six on the morning of July 2nd they arrived on the battlefield at Gettysburg, and their Second Corps was placed in position on the line to the left of the cemetery, being joined on its left by Sickles’ Third Corps, which extended that line to the vicinity of the Little Round Top. For some reason the First Minnesota Regiment was not placed in this line, but apparently in reserve, a short distance to the rear. Some time after noon Sickles advanced the Third Corps half a mile or more, to a slight ridge near the Emmitsburg road, his left extending to Devil’s Den, in front of and near the base of Little Round Top. Company F of the First Minnesota was detached as skirmishers, and sent in that direction. Soon after, the remaining eight companies of the regiment, numbering two hundred and sixty-two men (Company C was also absent, being the provost guard of the division,) were sent to the centre of the line just vacated by Sickles' battle in the peach orchard half a mile to the front, and witnessed with eager anxiety as Sickles' men gave way before the heavier forces of Longstreet and Hill, coming back broken and in utter disorder, followed by a strong force - the large brigades of Wilcox and Barksdale - in regular lines, moving steadily in the flush of victory, and firing on the fugitives. They were headed directly for the First Minnesote. When the two Confederate Brigades had reached the low ground in front of the Minnesota Regiment, it was evident that in a few minutes the Rebels would be upon both their front and on the rear of the left flank of their line. There was no organized force near to oppose them, except for the handful of two hundred and sixty-two men from Minnesota. Most soldiers, in the face of the near advance of such an overpowering force would have caught the panic and joined the retreating masses. But the First Minnesota had never yet deserted any post, had never retired without orders, and desperate as the situation seemed and as it was, the regiment stood firm against whatever might come. Just then Hancock, with a single aid, rode up at full speed and for a moment vainly endeavored to rally Sickles' retreating forces. Reserves had been sent for but were too far away to hope to reach the critical position until it would be occupied by the enemy, unless that enemy were stopped. The gap in the Union line was huge, with no troops left to prevent the Confederate forces from breaking through. Quickly leaving the fugitives, Hancock spurred to the only available unit he could see, the small band of Minnesota Volunteers calling out as he reached them, "What regiment is this?" "First Minnesota," replied Col. Colvill of the First. "Charge those lines!" commanded Hancock. Every man realized in an instant what that order meant, - death or wounds to them all; the sacrifice of the regiment to gain a few minutes time and save the position and probably the battlefield, - and every man saw and accepted the necessity for the sacrifice. Responding to Colvill's rapid orders, the regiment, in perfect line, with arms at "right shoulder shift," was in a moment sweeping down the slope directly upon the enemy's centre. No hesitation, no stopping to fire, and the men fell fast at every stride before the concentrated fire of the whole Confederate force. Silently, without orders, and almost from the start, double-quick had changed to utmost speed. In an instant, every boy became a man and every man a hero. Death and destruction from massive rounds and volleys of lead blew apart the ranks of the First, with groups of men dropping with every step. With leveled bayonets and at full speed, the First rushed upon the massive Confederate force. The first Confederate line and parts of their second broke in the front of the charging First, stopping the whole Confederate advance. The Minnesotans then poured in their first fire and took shelter at the low banks that a dry brook afforded and held the entire force at bay for a considerable time. Had the enemy rallied quickly to a counter charge, its great numbers would have crushed the First in a moment. But the ferocity of The First Minnesota seemed to paralyze them for the time, and although they poured upon them a terrible and continuous fire from the front and enveloping flanks, they kept at respectful distance. Shattered men and lives were strew about the area, with every officer killed or mortally wounded. As each commanding Officer fell in the onslaught, leadership eventually fell to John Peller, who, almost certainly carrying this very sword, commanded the Regiment until he nearly had his arm blown away at the shoulder. The Confederates were not without their losses as it has been claimed that Confederate General Barksdale was killed by Private William W. Brown of Company G while holding the Confederate force in check at the close of the charge. What Hancock had given them to do was done thoroughly. The regiment had stopped the enemy, and held back its mighty force and saved the position. It was however, a bloody and costly success. Every field officer was dead or lay weltering with bloody wounds. Of the two hundred and sixty-two men who made the charge, two hundred and fifteen lay upon the field, stricken down by rebel bullets, forty-seven were still in line, and not a man was missing. The annals of war contain no parallel to this charge. In its desperate valor, complete execution, successful result, and in its sacrifice of men in proportion to the number engaged, authentic history has no record with which it can be compared. Col. Fox, in his very carefully prepared work on "Regimental Losses in the American Civil War," says, at page 68, speaking of the Second Corps in this battle, "The fighting was deadly in the extreme, the percentage of loss in the First Minnesota, Gibbon's Division, being without an equal in the records of modern warfare." In another place (page 26) he notes that Gen. Hancock, in speaking of this charge, is reported to have said, "There is no more gallant deed recorded in history. I ordered these men in there because I saw I must gain five minutes time. Reinforcements were coming on the run, but I knew that before they could reach the threatened point the Confederate, unless checked, would seize the position. I would have ordered that regiment in if I had known that every man would be killed. It had to be done, and I was glad to find such a gallant body of men at hand willing to make the terrible sacrifice that the occasion demanded." Our hero Peller, was in command during the charge on July 2nd, after all the senior officers had been wounded. A minnie ball fractured his left arm, three inches below the shoulder. He lay on the field until after dark, when Dr LeBlond found him, bandaged his wound and sent him to the Leitner house, where a regimental hospital had been set up. Later, he was admitted to the Seminary Hospital in Gettysburg. From there he was admitted to the Armory Square General Hospital in Baltimore, MD, and appears to have had a slow recovery. The bullet had created a deep hole and had greatly damaged his muscles. He suffered a partial paralysis of 3rd and 4th fingers of his left hand. He was still unfit for duty in December 1863. He briefly returned home to Hastings to recover. In January he headed back east and on the 15th arrived back at the camp of the First Minnesota. Within a month they were given a farewell banquet in Washington DC and the regiment then returned to Fort Snelling. He was discharged with the regiment on May 4, 1864. That year, Governor Stephen Miller, who had been a...

    PRICE - $17,500.00


  6.  
    CASED SET OF DUELING PISTOLS
    CASED SET OF DUELING PISTOLS

    CASED SET OF DUELING PISTOLS

    This is a fine pair of German Style Dueling / Gentleman's Pistols inlayed with silver on the top barrel flats, "GUSTAV RICHTER IN BRESLAU". These guns retain only slight traces of original finish, but other than that are in excellent condition save for a repair to one hammer. The grips are beautifully checkered and near mint. The guns are iron mounted, all mounts with engraved surfaces. The pin escutcheons are German silver. The guns are in 52 caliber, rifled and all markings edges and action are sharp and crisp. The case retains all of its original accessories, all of which are in excellent condition. A nice set for some collector that likes cased Duelers and Officers Type Pistols.

    PRICE - $ 4,985.00


  7.  
    Colt 1849 Percussion Pocket Revolver
    Colt 1849 Percussion Pocket Revolver

    Colt 1849 Percussion Pocket Revolver

    This is a very nice 1849 Colt Pocket with 4" barrel and New York address. It is sharp and crisp to include an excellent action, light cylinder scene and excellent grips that retain almost all of their original varnish. As one can see in the photos, the frame retains about 60%b vivid case colors starting to fade and the balance of the gun is gray with the exception of slight traces of scattered color. The gun appears to have been cleaned to gray at one point during its life leaving only the frame colors. A really nice example for the price.

    PRICE - $ 995.00


  8.  
    AMES CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER
    AMES CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER

    AMES CIVIL WAR MOUNTAIN HOWITZER

    This is a great 1841 Model Ames Foundry 12 lb. Mountain Howitzer on reproduction carriage. These are probably the most desirable field piece among collectors today due to their relatively small stature, classic construction and general history. It shows wonderful condition with beautiful markings. I have a similar example in my office and these are just spectacular display and conversation pieces. When used as a giant shotgun at crucial locations, a pair of 12 pounders could be used with devastating effect to scatter hundreds of 1" lead balls at high velocity upon the enemy. They were used by both North and South with this one dated 1863, certainly issued to the North. Several were captured by both sides and turned against the original bearers. In my opinion, this is the optimum Civil War Collectible. I'd rather have 1 of these monsters in my display room than an entire wall of muskets. I cannot stress how difficult it is to find these smaller guns. Only a handful have been offered in the past ten years and I have been lucky enough that this is my third offering. There is no charge for delivery on this gun East of the Mississippi but a surcharge of an addition $500.00+ to the west of that point (depending on location). A similar gun with NO CARRIAGE sold at auction recently for over $64,000.00. A carriage runs about $8,000 - $10,000.00. That means only an Ames Mountain Howitzer tube sold for almost $65k and it was in no better condition than this one. Shop and compare, then check out our other field pieces throughout the pages of this website.

    PRICE - $56,500.00


  9.  
    COLT 1861 NAVY REVOLVER ID'D TO MICHIGAN CAVALRYMAN
    COLT 1861 NAVY REVOLVER ID'D TO MICHIGAN CAVALRYMAN


  10.  
     WAR OF 1812 DRAGOON HELMET, EXTREMELY RARE
     WAR OF 1812 DRAGOON HELMET, EXTREMELY RARE

    WAR OF 1812 DRAGOON HELMET, EXTREMELY RARE

    From the War of 1812 period, this is one of rarest artifacts that we have ever offered for sale. Only a hand-full of these Regulation First Issue Dragoon Helmets are known to exist with one of the better examples selling for nearly $20,000.00 at an auction a few years ago. This is the very first model of headgear that was issued to American Cavalry or Dragoon Soldiers. The Dragoon insignia on the front is of pewter and this is designated in the first regulation order for these helmets. Over 200 years old, this example is in very fine condition for its age with most of its shiny polished leather intact and most of the pewter or tin trim pieces intact. The white horse hair plume is also nearly complete, and original. The lining and sweat-band are also original and complete, and the inspectors initials are clearly marked on the underside of its visor. For all you collectors that complain that nothing great ever shows up anymore, I disagree. This helmet proves the point. This helmet has been on the website for quite a while with no price or description because I couldn't decide if I should keep it. That decision was made easy when I recently purchased an important identified Colt with Gettysburg history. For American Mounted Military Collectors, this is a must.

    PRICE - $10,500.00


  11.  
    ALLEN & WHEELOCK PEPPERBOX PISTOL
    ALLEN & WHEELOCK PEPPERBOX PISTOL

    ALLEN & WHEELOCK PEPPERBOX PISTOL

    This is a good condition Allen & Wheelock marked 31 caliber pepperbox with engraved nipple shield and fluted barrels. markings are visible but not sharp. Action is perfect when pointed down, but does not function when pointed up. It obviously needs a hand-spring. Fine, full grips showing most original varnish. A very presentable example.

    PRICE - $450.00


  12.  
    Original Indian Catlinite Pipe with carved and beaded stem
    Original Indian Catlinite Pipe with carved and beaded stem

    Original Indian Catlinite Pipe with carved and beaded stem

    This is a wonderful and original Antique Indian Catlinite pipe with its original, bead decorated carved wooden stem. Probably a Plains Indian product, it is in wonderful condition. Frankly, I know little else about it and would welcome any additional information.

    PRICE - $ 2,975.00 RECENTLY SOLD !


  13.  
    Metropolitan Arms Percussion Revolver
    Metropolitan Arms Percussion Revolver

    Metropolitan Arms Percussion Revolver

    This is a Metropolitan Arms Company Police Revolver featuring the creeping loading lever that was basically a copy of the Colt 1862 Police Model Revolver. It is in relic condition with a group of horrible looking brass screws holding it together. I can only surmise that whoever found this gun basically destroyed all the original screws while attempting to remove them, which is not surprising. Regardless, it could be put back together with proper screws and internal parts or just left as the relic it is. It is thought that the Metropolitan Arms Company was formed as an attempt to capitalize on the destruction of the Colt factory and for a short period saw relatively brisk sales. When Colt recovered its production capabilities and the Civil War ended, Metropolitan could no longer compete and dies a financial death in 1866. If one were to be in need of a decent lever, trigger guard or excellent grips for their metro, this could fill a void.

    PRICE - $ 275.00


  14.  
    CIVIL WAR COLT ARMY REVOLVER, COLT 1860
    CIVIL WAR COLT ARMY REVOLVER, COLT 1860

    CIVIL WAR COLT ARMY REVOLVER, COLT 1860

    I'll make this description short and sweet. The action on this gun works great, it is all matching numbers and the markings are faint due too somebody whizzing it with sandpaper. It is still a real gun and should be salvaged by removing these marks. A good project gun for someone with skill and patience.

    PRICE - $ 995.00


  15.  
    COLT CONVERSION REVOLVERS
    COLT CONVERSION REVOLVERS

    COLT CONVERSION REVOLVERS

    This is an absolutely untouched Colt Pocket Navy Conversion Revolver, rather hard to find with the ejector system. All markings, edges and action are sharp and crisp and it sports a fine set of original grips. The gun shows 80%+ original nickel plating mixing with untouched patina. The gun has never been polished or cleaned on as with most aged nickel guns.

    PRICE - $ 1,450.00


  16.  
    CONFEDERATE AUGUSTA MACHINE WORKS REVOLVER
    CONFEDERATE AUGUSTA MACHINE WORKS REVOLVER

    CONFEDERATE AUGUSTA MACHINE WORKS REVOLVER

    Without question, this is one of the most outstanding Confederate Revolvers ever offered for sale. This is an absolutely gorgeous 12-stop, Augusta Machine Works Revolver that has seen little, if any use. The markings, edges and action on this beautiful gun with 7 & 3/4" barrel are nearly flat perfect. The grips show 99% original finish and the metal parts on this gun have a stunning, untouched patina. There are traces of original blue on the barrel. Note the brass wedge screw that I believe to be original, that contrasts with the blue hue. The gun is in dark, untouched brown patina and I have taken photos of the gun on both a light and a dark background so that you can see the color and texture of the metal properly. I picked up this gun in central Pennsylvania with a couple of Patersons and a very good Confederate Dance Revolver (Dragoon Size) along with some other goodies. I found a more common six-stop just a few weeks later. As I researched these guns, I found one with a ton of finish that had sold in an East Coast Auction for over $90,000 in 1993 with holster and unquestionable provenance direct from the family descendants of Lieutenant Colonel Roswell Russell of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry. After finding that the heaviest action the 9th ever saw was the Battle of Griswoldville during Sherman's famous "March to the Sea", the eventual landing places of the guns became clear to me. The Russell gun and this 12-stop were discovered in the Harrisburg, Pa. area, and the 6-stop on this website came from York, only 20 miles away. It was found at a garage sale and was thought by the owner to be a reproduction. All 3 guns, 20 miles apart from each other. During my reading, I learned that just a few days prior to the battle, word went out to all nearby towns (including Augusta) that the Union was on their way to destroy all the Military Works at Griswoldville. The local Militias and worker citizens from all the nearby towns converged on Griswoldville to help in their defense, but the Union forces were too much for what was primarily an army of citizen soldiers. It is clear to me that the eventual overwhelming victory of the 9th resulted in their troopers carrying home these guns as war trophies. Somebody should write a story about it. The 6-stop revolver I have is priced much lower than this gun. I love this classic 12-stop as it almost speaks to me and I don't mind keeping it. In a recent auction on the West Coast, some eye-popping prices were garnered for lesser guns. If you are a person of means and want the very best, this could be a candidate to add to your collection. It is unquestionably one of the best Confederate Arms ever found and sometimes such a chance to own is a once in a lifetime event.

    PRICE - $70,000.00


  17.  
    SPENCER RIFLE ISSUED TO MICHIGAN CAVALRY
    SPENCER RIFLE ISSUED TO MICHIGAN CAVALRY

    SPENCER RIFLE ISSUED TO MICHIGAN CAVALRY

    This is a great, historical Spencer Rifle. As issued to Michigan Cavalry and in the 15XX serial range, it is one of but a handful to have survived the war. Only two units of the Army of the Potomac were armed with Spencer Repeating Rifles at Gettysburg, the 5th and 6th Michigan under George Armstrong Custer who fought off Jeb Stuarts Cavalry led by the famous Wade Hampton and the beloved Colonel William G. Conner who was commanding the heroic Jeff Davis Legion. It is thought by many historians that Conner was the trooper that Hampton tried to rescue during a grand counter-attack on the fateful day. During the height of the battle, Conner had captured a Yankee Color and was surrounded by troopers who ordered his surrender. He killed two of them with his Colt Revolver before being brought down in a blaze of gunfire with Hampton receiving 3 wounds and barely escaping death. This wonderfully conditioned Spencer Rifle was undoubtedly in the East Field at Gettysburg during the epic Cavalry struggle that many feel saved the day for the Union Army, probably the most important event after the magnificent efforts of the 1st Minnesota, Michigan Iron Brigade and the 20th Maine's action on Little Round Top. This Spencer Rifle is the 3rd we have handled in the past 5 years and is without question, the best condition example we have ever encountered. The markings are extremely crisp as shown in the photos and the edges and action are also sharp. The wood is fine and full with remnants of a cartouche. Best of all, the gun is in an overall medium brown patina that has never been touched. It is beautiful. A great Gettysburg Artifact that is worthy of the finest Gettysburg or Civil War Collection.

    PRICE - $ 8,750.00 - SALE PENDING !


  18.  
    Colt 3rd Model 1851 Navy Revolver
    Colt 3rd Model 1851 Navy Revolver

    Colt 3rd Model 1851 Navy Revolver

    This is a very good condition Colt Third model 1851 Navy Revolver that shows heavy carry. This carried history is evident due to the worn muzzle and heavily weathered but full grips. The site is actually worn down flush to the barrel. All markings remained extremely crisp and the cylinder seen is about 90% visible, though showing wear. The action is nearly perfect. There are traces of original silver plating on the back strap and trigger guard. The gun is in an overall gray patina. The hammer and lever screws appear to be replacements, but other than that the entire gun is original and matching. The gun is missing all its nipples, easily replaced. It's rather surprising to find a gun with this much muzzle where and yet still be in generally good to very good condition. It certainly appears to be a fine old veteran of the American Civil War and probably saw use on the frontier for an extended period as well.

    PRICE - $1,485.00


  19.  
    J. (Joshua) Yous Kentucky Rifle
    J. (Joshua) Yous Kentucky Rifle

    J. (Joshua) Yous Kentucky Rifle

    This is a very nice rifle made by Joshua Yous and inlaid in silver behind the rear site with "J. YOUS". At first glance, I thought this to be a rifle made by J. H. Johnston of Waynesboro. Pa. but the silver plaque threw that out the window. It has all the characteristics of a Johnston. I have owned 4 Johnstons and sold about the best one that a collector could hope to find, but this guns has much more going for it, having a large amount of embellishment in coin silver inlays and mounted in German Silver. Yous worked in Greencastle, Pa. which is just west over the mountain from Waynesboro, so I wouldn't doubt he had a strong relationship to Johnston and/or his work. The mountings give the gun a very striking appearance. It is indeed a great looking gun and would be priced higher if not for the need of a few wood repairs. Yous was born in 1827 and died in 1905. He was known as a man of great mechanical genius and the inventor of several small articles. Yous is first listed in the tax assessments of Antrim Township, Franklin County the year of 1850 as a laborer. The first year he was listed as a gunsmith is 1854.

    PRICE - RECENTLY SOLD !


  20.  
    MASSACHUSETTS ARMS / WESSON & LEAVITT REVOLVER
    MASSACHUSETTS ARMS / WESSON & LEAVITT REVOLVER

    MASSACHUSETTS ARMS / WESSON & LEAVITT REVOLVER

    This is a very ggod condition Massachusetts Arms Pocket Revolver in 31 caliber bearing the Wesson's & Leavitt's patent marking on the lockplate. This gun looks a bit blotchy as it was obviously found in brown patina and someone has cleaned, being done long, long ago. It shows good markings to the top-strap and lock-plate and nearly all of its acid etched cylinder scene. Nice full grips with chips to the toes but they retains no varnish. This gun is locked in the hammer-back position and needs work on the action. Not bad for a fairly rare gun in very decent shape.

    PRICE - $ 1,350.00

 

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